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Can anyone explain this code to me? Whats the meaning and how to use it?

    Function.prototype.createInterceptor = function createInterceptor(fn) {
       var scope = {};
       return function () {
           if (fn.apply(scope, arguments)) {
               return this.apply(scope, arguments);
           }
           else {
               return null;
           }
       };
   };
   var interceptMe = function cube(x) {
           console.info(x);
           return Math.pow(x, 3);
       };
   //
   var cube = interceptMe.createInterceptor(function (x) {
       return typeof x === "number";
   });
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The code is not functional as is, so I made this edit:

Function.prototype.createInterceptor = function createInterceptor(fn) {
    var scope = {},
        original = this; //<-- add this
    return function () {
        if (fn.apply(scope, arguments)) {
            return original.apply(scope, arguments);
        }
        else {
            return null;
        }
    };
};
var interceptMe = function cube(x) {
        console.info(x);
        return Math.pow(x, 3);
    };
//
var cube = interceptMe.createInterceptor(function (x) {
    return typeof x === "number";
});

The interceptor function validates what is passed to the original function before calling it, and returns null if it didn't see the arguments as valid. If the arguments are valid, then the original function is called.

cube(3) //27 - the argument is valid so the original function is called
cube("asd") //null - Not valid according to the interceptor so null is returned
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ohh ic ic.... if (fn.apply(scope, arguments)) { return original.apply(scope, arguments); } what about that code? can you expalin it more sppecific? Thanks. –  user430926 Jun 21 '12 at 11:09
    
@user430926 if calling the validator/interceptor function (fn), returns a truthy result, then call the original function (original) and return it's result. .apply is used to pass all arguments around. –  Esailija Jun 21 '12 at 11:10

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