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I need to execute correctly finished task to the the queue again (some kind of loop). Is it allright to override afterExecute method and just call getQueue().offer(runnable); ? I am worry about thread synchronization, thanks.

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2 Answers 2

An executor may run different tasks, not only that one you want to repeat. So in the overriding afterExecute method you should determine if the finished task is the task to be repeated. As a result, the executor is aware of a particular task. This is a bad design, INHO.

Consider using ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor.scheduleWithFixedDelay(). It requires that delay>0, though, but you can set delay to 1 nanosecond.

Another option (which I prefer) is to wrap your task in another Runnable which resubmits itself if nested task finished correctly.

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There is a large amount of small tasks (peer-server communication, not sheduled). Wrapping all reused tasks-I tried, but isn´t it costly operation ? –  Petr Kalafatic Jun 21 '12 at 11:14
    
If you have a large number of small tasks, I would suggest you combine them using a loop or collection. You only need one task per CPU to keep every CPU busy. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 21 '12 at 11:18
    
Wrapping would not be costly, you are not kicking off a thread within a thread, just wrapping one object in another. However, I don't think this is a good approach because you will be locking up the thread while repeating execution rather than putting it back in the queue for execution on the next available thread after servicing other actions –  John B Jun 21 '12 at 11:19
    
I don't like the idea of the Runnable that resubmits itself. This is because it means that the Runnable must have access to the executor that is invoking it. Instead I would do a manager that submits tasks and gets notified by the Runnable upon successful completion. The manager would determine if the Runnable should be resubmitted. There is a slight risk here that the Runnable may be in execution in multiple threads concurrently. But if the notification method is the last thing being done there should not be a risk. –  John B Jun 21 '12 at 11:22
    
@John B: I see no harm for Runnable to have access to the executor. Imagine you implement a tree-like algorithm like quick sort - where root task spawns subtasks for subarrays, and so on. Do you think an external manager is suitable for this? –  Alexei Kaigorodov Jul 6 '12 at 4:15
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There should not be an issue with what you propose. However, don't call getQueue().offer(), instead just call submit() on the executor service. Also, since afterExecute is a protected method, I assume you have created a sub-class of ThreadPoolExecutorService? Be sure to call super.afterExecute() in your afterExecute method.

Personally, I like the idea of a submitter class that is responsible for putting Runnables on the service. Use a callback to notify the submitter when execution has completed (maybe by using a Callable instead of a Runnable) and the submitter determines if the task should be resubmitted. This works nicely from an isolation of concerns prospective.

Finally, @Alexei's suggestions are probably good ones to consider as a more standard alternative to subclassing ThreadPoolExecutorService.

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Yes, I have TPE subclass, calling super in overrided afterExecute method. As you mentioned there is execution thread lock possibility which I want to avoid. I want something like: get the finished runnable-check state and if OK then insert to the end of queue to execute in future (let the thread process another runnable)-something like some async add.. –  Petr Kalafatic Jun 21 '12 at 11:38
    
You could cast the Runnable to some other class type that allows for the retrieval of the state and do the check. This will work but is not the best solution I think. This is the purpose of Callable and Future but they do require additional thread for monitoring the Futures –  John B Jun 21 '12 at 11:45
    
I will try it, thank you –  Petr Kalafatic Jun 21 '12 at 11:48
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