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I have a data.frame df in format "long".

df <- data.frame(site = rep(c("A","B","C"), 1, 7),
                 time = c(11,11,11,22,22,22,33),
                 value = ceiling(rnorm(7)*10))
df <- df[order(df$site), ]

df
  site time value
1    A   11    12
2    A   22   -24
3    A   33   -30
4    B   11     3
5    B   22    16
6    C   11     3
7    C   22     9

Question

How do I remove the rows where an unique element of df$time is not present for each of the levels of df$site ?

In this case I want to remove df[3,], because for df$time the timestamp 33 is only present for site A and not for site B and site C.

Desired output:

df.trimmed
  site time value
1    A   11    12
2    A   22   -24
4    B   11     3
5    B   22    16
6    C   11     3
7    C   22     9

The data.frame has easily 800k rows and 200k unique timestamps. I don't want to use loops but I don't know how to use vectorized functions like apply() or lapply() for this case.

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If a timestamp is present for more than one site, but is not present in all sites, would you still be interested in that row, or are you only interested in rows where the timestamp is present in all sites? If the former, see my updated answer which makes use of merge and table to help subsetting. –  Ananda Mahto Jun 21 '12 at 14:19
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's another possible solution using the data.table package:

unTime <- unique(df$time)

library(data.table)

DT <- data.table(df, key = "site")

(notInAll <- unique(DT[, list(ans = which(!unTime %in% time)), by = key(DT)]$ans))
# [1] 3

DT[time %in% unTime[-notInAll]]

#      site time value
# [1,]    A   11     3
# [2,]    A   22    11
# [3,]    B   11    -6
# [4,]    B   22    -2
# [5,]    C   11   -19
# [6,]    C   22   -14

EDIT from Matthew
Nice. Or a slightly more direct way :

DT = as.data.table(df)
tt = DT[,length(unique(site)),by=time]
tt
   time V1
1:   11  3
2:   22  3
3:   33  1

tt = tt[V1==max(V1)]      # See * below
tt
   time V1
1:   11  3
2:   22  3

DT[time %in% tt$time]
   site time value
1:    A   11     7
2:    A   22    -2
3:    B   11     8
4:    B   22   -10
5:    C   11     3
6:    C   22     1

In case no time is present in all sites, when final result should be empty (as Ben pointed out in comments), the step marked * above could be :

tt = tt[V1==length(unique(DT$site))]
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Thank you for the suggestions. The package does a very good job and is really fast. It takes less than 2 seconds for 2.711.520 rows! –  Max Jun 21 '12 at 13:04
    
@maxmagmilch, the biggest thanks should go to Matthew Dowle (the package's author and maintainer and an active presence on SO)! –  BenBarnes Jun 21 '12 at 13:07
    
@BenBarnes Hi, very kind thanks. Btw, did presentation from LondonR find its way to you. Interested in how it comes across "cold" as it were. –  Matt Dowle Jun 22 '12 at 8:59
    
@MatthewDowle, thanks for the edit with the more direct logic. Something that just occurred to me would be a potential issue when there is no time present for all sites. But that's an easy check. And many thanks for the link to your presentation. I think it's very clear, and I had forgotten about the list columns capabilities - very handy! Also totally thrilled about := by group in 1.8.1. –  BenBarnes Jun 22 '12 at 11:43
    
@Ben Thanks. Good point, edited. –  Matt Dowle Jun 22 '12 at 12:14
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Would rle work for you?

df <- df[order(df$time), ]
df <- subset(df, time != rle(df$time)$value[rle(df$time)$lengths == 1])
df <- df[order(df$site), ]
df
##   site time value
## 1    A   11    17
## 4    A   22    -3
## 2    B   11     8
## 5    B   22     5
## 3    C   11     0
## 6    C   22    13

Re-looking at your data, it seems that this solution might be too simple for your needs though....

Update

Here's an approach that should be better than the rle solution that I put above. Rather than look for a run-length of "1", will delete rows that do not match certain conditions of the results of table(df$site, df$time). To illustrate, I've also added some more fake data.

df <- data.frame(site = rep(c("A","B","C"), 1, 7),
                 time = c(11,11,11,22,22,22,33),
                 value = ceiling(rnorm(7)*10))
df2 <- data.frame(site = rep(c("A","B","C"), 1, 7),
                 time = c(14,14,15,15,16,16,16),
                 value = ceiling(rnorm(7)*10))
df <- rbind(df, df2)
df <- df[order(df$site), ]

temp <- as.numeric(names(which(colSums(with(df, table(site, time)))
                               >= length(levels(df$site)))))
df2 <- merge(df, data.frame(temp), by.x = "time", by.y = "temp")
df2 <- df2[order(df2$site), ]
df2
##   time site value
## 3   11    A    -2
## 4   16    A    -2
## 7   22    A     2
## 1   11    B   -16
## 5   16    B     3
## 8   22    B    -6
## 2   11    C     8
## 6   16    C    11
## 9   22    C   -10

Here's the result of tabulating and summing up the site/time combination:

colSums(with(df, table(site, time)))
## 11 14 15 16 22 33 
##  3  2  2  3  3  1 

Thus, if we were interested in including sites where at least two sites had the timestamp, we could change the line >= length(levels(df$site)) (in this example, 3) to >= length(levels(df$site))-1 (obviously, 2).

Not sure if this solution is useful to you at all, but I thought I would share it to show the flexibility in solutions we have with R.

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