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Thanks to the brilliant help on my XML parsing problem I got to a point where I am lost in how XML elements are actually processed (with lxml).

My data is the output of a nmap scan, made up of many records like the ones below:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<?xml-stylesheet href="file:///usr/share/nmap/nmap.xsl" type="text/xsl"?>
<nmaprun scanner="nmap" args="nmap -sV -p135,12345 -oX 10.232.0.0.16.xml 10.232.0.0/16" start="1340201347" startstr="Wed Jun 20 16:09:07 2012" version="5.21" xmloutputversion="1.03">
  <host>
    <status state="down" reason="no-response"/>
    <address addr="10.232.0.1" addrtype="ipv4"/>
  </host>  
  <host starttime="1340201455" endtime="1340201930">
    <status state="up" reason="echo-reply"/>
    <address addr="10.232.49.2" addrtype="ipv4"/>
    <hostnames>
      <hostname name="host1.example.com" type="PTR"/>
    </hostnames>
    <ports>
      <port protocol="tcp" portid="135">
        <state state="open" reason="syn-ack" reason_ttl="123"/>
        <service name="msrpc" product="Microsoft Windows RPC" ostype="Windows" method="probed" conf="10"/>
      </port>
      <port protocol="tcp" portid="12345">
        <state state="open" reason="syn-ack" reason_ttl="123"/>
        <service name="http" product="Trend Micro OfficeScan Antivirus http config" method="probed" conf="10"/>
      </port>
    </ports>
    <times srtt="890" rttvar="2835" to="100000"/>
  </host>
</nmaprun>

I am looking at generating a line when

  • port 12345 is open or
  • port 135 is open and 12345 is open

I use the following code for this, which I commented with my understanding of how things go:

from lxml import etree
import time

scanTime = str(int(time.time()))
d = etree.parse("10.233.85.0.22.xml")

# find all hosts records
for el_host in d.findall("host"):
    # only process hosts UP
    if el_host.find("status").attrib["state"] =="up":

         # here comes a piece of code which sets the variable hostname
         # used later - that part works fine (removed for clarity)

         # get the status of port 135 and 12345
         Open12345 = Open135 = False
         for el_port in el_host.findall("ports/port"):
             # we are now looping thought the <port> records for a given <host>
             if el_port.attrib["portid"] == "135":
                Open135 = el_host.find("ports/port/state").attrib["state"] == "open"
             if el_port.attrib["portid"] == "12345":
                Open12345 = el_host.find("ports/port/state").attrib["state"] == "open"
                # I want to get for port 12345 the description, so I search
                # for <service> within a given port - only 12345 in my case
                # I just search the first one as there is only one
                # this is the place I am not sure I get right
                el_service = el_host.find("ports/port/service")
                if el_service.get("product") is not None:
                   Type12345 = el_host.find("ports/port/service").attrib["product"]

         if Open12345:
            print "%s %s \"%s\"\n" % (scanTime,hostname,Type12345)
         if not Open12345 and Open135:
            print "%s %s \"%s\"\n" % (scanTime,hostname,"NO_OfficeScan")

The place I am not sure of is highlighted in the comments. With this code I always match Microsoft Windows RPC, like if I was within the record for port 135 (it comes first in the XML file, before port 12345).

I am sure that the problem is somewhere in the way I understand the find function. It probably matches everything, independently of the place I am in. In other words there is no recursion (as far as I can tell).

In that case how can I code the concept of "get the service name when you are in the record for port 12345"?

Thank you.


EDIT & SOLUTION:

I found the problem in my code. I repost the whole script if someone someday stumbles upon this problem (the output comes from nmap so it could be interesting for someone to reuse - this it to explain the big chunk of code below :) :

#!/usr/bin/python

from lxml import etree
import time
import argparse

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument("file", help="XML file to parse")
args = parser.parse_args()


scanTime = str(int(time.time()))
d = etree.parse(args.file)

f = open("OfficeScanComplianceDSCampus."+scanTime,"w")
print "Parsing "+ args.file

# find all hosts records
for el_host in d.findall("host"):
    # only process hosts UP
    if el_host.find("status").attrib["state"] =="up":
         # get the first hostname if it exists, otherwise IP
         el_hostname = el_host.find("hostnames/hostname")
         if el_hostname is not None:
            hostname = el_hostname.attrib["name"]
         else:
              hostname = el_host.find("address").attrib["addr"]

         # get the status of port 135 and 12345
         Open12345 = Open135 = False
         for el_port in el_host.findall("ports/port"):
             # we are now looping thought the <port> records for a given <host>
             if el_port.attrib["portid"] == "135":
                Open135 = el_port.find("state").attrib["state"] == "open"
             if el_port.attrib["portid"] == "12345":
                Open12345 = el_port.find("state").attrib["state"] == "open"
                # if port open get info about service
                if Open12345:
                   el_service = el_port.find("service")
                   if el_service is None:
                      Type12345 = "UNKNOWN"
                   elif el_service.get("method") == "probed":
                      Type12345 = el_service.get("product")
                   else:
                        Type12345 = "UNKNOWN"


         if Open12345:
            f.write("%s %s \"%s\"\n" % (scanTime,hostname,Type12345))
         if not Open12345 and Open135:
            f.write("%s %s \"%s\"\n" % (scanTime,hostname,"NO_OfficeScan"))
         if Open12345 and not Open135:
            f.write("%s %s \"%s\"\n" % (scanTime,hostname,"Non-Windows with 12345"))

f.close()

I will also explore the xpath idea given by Dikei and Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams.

Thank you everyone!

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2  
Why not use XPath expressions to see if the nodes you care about exist? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 21 '12 at 11:22
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should be easy with xpath

from lxml import etree
d = etree.parse("10.233.85.0.22.xml")

d.xpath('//port[@portid="12345"]/service/@name') // return name of service in portid=12345
d.xpath('//port[@portid="12345"]/service/@product') // return product in port with portid=12345
share|improve this answer
    
I just had a look at the lxml doc to understand this new concept (for me). It seems interesting but what is returned is a list with all service names (or products) - without relation to the place they come from, in particular the host. I will dig the relative naming in xpath to see if this could help. Thanks for the pointer. –  WoJ Jun 21 '12 at 11:45
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