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I want to print just the HTTP status code for a web page retrieved using cURL. Is it possible to do this with an AWK one-liner?

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If you're using Gawk, you may not even need cURL. Traditional awk doesn't have any way to open sockets or make HTTP connections, but gawk does have is ability. But the script may be more than a one-liner, as it will have to implement its own rudimentary support of HTTP. Check the Gawk networking documentation for details. –  ghoti Jun 21 '12 at 12:10
    
@ghoti Agreed. This question specifically addresses getting the status from cURL, and a socket solution wouldn't make a good one-liner. It should certainly be possible to do this entirely in gawk, but it's a little outside the scope of the question as posed. Still, if you have a solution for it, I'd be very interested. Perhaps as another Q&A? –  CodeGnome Jun 21 '12 at 12:18

2 Answers 2

You can get it with just curl, without even using awk:

curl http://example.com/ -w '%{response_code}' -so /dev/null
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%{response_code} is an alias added in curl 7.18.2. It's safer to use %{http_code} instead –  Grzegorz Luczywo Aug 5 at 18:22
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Solution

The following one-liner will read the HTTP header from a pipe, and print out the status code.

awk 'BEGIN {"curl -sI http://example.com" | getline; print "Status Code: " $2}'

Interesting Aspects

There are a few nice things about this approach that may not be obvious at first glance. For example:

  • This solution is pure AWK; no shell script or wrapper required.
  • Since we only care about the first line of the header, we don't need to track or compare NR to skip undesirable lines.
  • $0 is populated in a BEGIN block, so AWK doesn't need a file argument.
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