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I want to put an interface down and up every 1 second for 80 times, how can I implement this by a bash script?

Something like this?

COUNT = 80
for n in $(seq -w 1 $COUNT); do
    case $n in   
    [1,3,5,7,9....79]*) # I don't know how to represent the odd value only
       ifconfig veth1 down
       sleep 1
       ;;
    [2,4,6,8,10....80]*)
       ifconfig veth1 up
       sleep 1
       ;;
   esac
done 
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Have you tried it? Did it work? If not, what error do you get? What's the expected and actual output, if any? Please edit your question accordingly. –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 21 '12 at 11:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
COUNT=40
for n in $(seq -w 1 $COUNT); do
  ifconfig veth1 down
  sleep 1
  ifconfig veth1 up
  sleep 1
done

Or if you really want to count to 80:

COUNT=80
for n in $(seq -w 1 $COUNT); do
  case $n in
    *[13579])
     ifconfig veth1 down
     ;;
    *)
     ifconfig veth1 up
     ;;
  esac
  sleep 1
done
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+1, no real need to use a case statement. –  chepner Jun 21 '12 at 12:32

Toggle a flag:

#!/bin/bash
for ((i = 1, flag = 0; i <= 80; i++))
do
    if ((flag ^= 1))
    then
        ifconfig veth1 down    # odd
    else
        ifconfig veth1 up
    fi
    sleep 1
done
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for finding a use for a bitwise exclusive OR in a shell script. –  CodeGnome Jun 21 '12 at 23:34

use % operator. like the following, replace the echo with the commands you want

count=0
while [ $count -lt 80 ]
do
    if (( $count % 2 == 0 ))
    then
        echo 'aaa'
    else
        echo 'bbb'
    fi

    count=$(( $count + 1 ))
done
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1  
while (( count < 80 )) and (( count++ )) but wouldn't you really rather let Bash maintain the counter? for ((count = 0; count < 80; count++)) –  Dennis Williamson Jun 21 '12 at 16:39

If you don't mind the bashisms, you can make your code much more concise through the use of various expansions available in Bash. For example:

for i in {1..80}; do
    case $((i % 2)) in
        0) ifconfig veth1 down ;;
        1) ifconfig veth1 up   ;;
    esac
    sleep 1
done

The magic here is the {1..80} sequence expression, coupled with the modulo operator to determine whether the number is odd or even. If your version of Bash doesn't support sequence expressions for any reason, just use $(seq 1 80) instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Sequence expressions were introduced in Bash 3 almost 8 years ago. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 21 '12 at 16:36
    
@DennisWilliamson You're right...it was the sequence expression increment that was added in Bash 4. Since my example doesn't use sequence increments, I'll update the answer. –  CodeGnome Jun 21 '12 at 23:12
    
Sequence expressions are nice as far as they go, but they don't seem to be able to use variables. That is, c=4; echo {1..$c} does not return 1 2 3 4, but {1..4}. You would need to eval this to expand it. And if eval is the answer..... So anyway, +1 for $((i % 2)), but -1 for {1..80} because of the loss of flexibility. –  Graham Jun 26 '12 at 21:33

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