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I have a class with a static factory constructor which returns a pointer to the object created.

I have to declare the object as a static object inside a namespace but I don't know how to delete it correctly

class Foo
{
   public:
   Foo(int, int* );
   virtual ~Foo();
   static Foo* MyFooInitializer(int n )
   {
      int *p = new int[n];
      for (int i=0; i<n; i++)
         p[i]=i;

      Foo *ret = new Foo(n,p);
      delete p;
      return ret;
   }
   int someFooFunction(int a);
}

Then in my namespace I have a static inline function

namespace MyNamespace
{

    static inline void  myfunction()
    {
        static Foo  *foo1 = Foo::MyFooInitializer(10); 
        int y = somevalue();
        int x = foo1->someFooFunction(int y);
    } 
}

I obviously have a memory leak here because the object is never deleted.

The important fact is that I need that foo1 is declared as static because once created it must be the same object during all the program and must be unique (it keeps track of some variables).

Probably this is a design problem, but I don't know how to delete it when my program exits or when I explicitly want to delete it to reinitialize it.

SOLUTION:

I modified the body of MyFooInitializer this way:

   static Foo* MyFooInitializer(int n )
   {
      int *p = new int[n];
      for (int i=0; i<n; i++)
         p[i]=i;

      static Foo ret = Foo(n,p);
      delete[] p;
      return &ret;
   }

This allows me to release all the memory correctly when the program terminates. Valgrind says all the heap memory is freed!

share|improve this question
    
You haven't used new() anywhere so why do you think you have a memory leak? –  Alok Save Jun 21 '12 at 12:14
    
@Als I bet there's a new in MyFooInitializer. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 21 '12 at 12:15
1  
@LuchianGrigore: It could very well be a local static instance which always remains alive throughout the program lifetime.And if it is not, just replace the new with one and then there's no leak :) –  Alok Save Jun 21 '12 at 12:16
    
What is "g" in your function? Why are you initializing "p" and then just deleting it? –  mfontanini Jun 21 '12 at 13:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no need for allocating that Foo on the heap here:

static Foo* MyFooInitializer(int x) {
    static Foo some_foo(x);
    return &some_foo;
}

There are no leaks in that code, that Foo will be destroyed when your program ends.

Note that if the pointer returned by MyFooInitializer actually points to some class which inherits from Foo, then you'd just have to use the derived type for the static variable:

static Foo* MyFooInitializer(int x) {
    static SomeFooDerived some_foo(x);
    return &some_foo;
}

Edit: Since you provided the actual function body, my answer is valid. You'd do it like this:

static Foo* MyFooInitializer(int n ) {
   // Don't know what this p is, anyway...
   int *p = new int[n];
   for (int i=0; i<n; i++)
      p[i]=i;

   static Foo ret(n,g); // what is g?
   delete[] p; // smart pointer plx
   return &ret;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Where's the slicing? I see a pointer in my example. –  mfontanini Jun 21 '12 at 12:17
    
Oh, my bad.4321 –  Luchian Grigore Jun 21 '12 at 12:18
    
And thus we've come to the Singleton Pattern. –  Agent_L Jun 21 '12 at 12:26
    
+1 For "There is no need for allocating that Foo on the heap". This is very true. –  Alok Save Jun 21 '12 at 12:26
    
Yes, it's basically a singleton. There is no need to allocate on the heap for every call to MyFooInitializer, since you already know that the lifetime of that object will last till the end of the application. –  mfontanini Jun 21 '12 at 12:27

How about

static inline void  myfunction()
{
    static std::unique_ptr<Foo> foo1(Foo::MyFooInitializer(10));
    int y = somevalue();
    int x = foo1->someFooFunction(int y);
} 
share|improve this answer
    
I don't find unique_ptr (I'm writing C++ O3 compliant). I'm writing my code with g++-4.4 and it must compile on g++ >= 4.0 and windows, it seems that unique_ptr is not here in standard headers <memory>. Where can I find it? (i can't use boost). –  linello Jun 21 '12 at 12:29
    
@linello never-mind then :) –  Luchian Grigore Jun 21 '12 at 12:32

If you absolutely need to create the foo1 dynamically, then write an extra class and make it static/global by value. Then use it's destructor to delete object(s).

class MasterControlClass
{
    public:
    Foo* foo1;
    MasterControl(){foo1 = NULL;}
    ~MasterControl(){delete(foo1), foo1 = NULL;}
};



static inline void myfunction()
{
     static MasterControlClass mcp;
     mcp.foo1 = Foo::MyFooInitializer(10); 
}

In this way, when your program is closing, the mcp desctructor will get called and will do the cleanup. If you want to reinitialize, then ofc you have to delete foo1 at every assign, just add

if(mcp.foo1)
{
    delete mcp.foo1;
    mcp.foo1= NULL;
}

Or even better, move it to a method of mcp.

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