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Let's say I have to recursively iterate over items stored in a tree structure in the background and I want to walk this tree using multiple threads from a thread pool (one thread per "folder" node). I have already managed to implement this using several different low and high-level approaches provided by the OmniThreadLibrary.

However, what I haven't figured out yet is how to properly detect that the scan has actually completed, i.e. that every last leaf node has been processed.

I found various examples on the net that either checked whether GlobalThreadPool.CountExecuting + GlobalThreadPool.CountQueued <= 0 or that used a IOmniTaskGroup.WaitForAll(). Unfortunately, none of these approaches appears to work for me. The check always returns True too early, i.e. when there still are some tasks running. None of the examples I looked at used recursion though - and those that did did not use a thread pool - is this maybe just not a good combination in the first place?

Here's a (very) simplified example code snippet of how I'm trying to do this at the moment:

procedure CreateScanFolderTask(const AFolder: IFolder);
begin
  CreateTask(ScanFolder)
    .SetParameter('Folder', AFolder)
    .Schedule();
end;

procedure ScanFolder(const ATask: IOmniTask);
var
  lFolder,
  lCurrentFolder: IFolder;
begin
  if ATaks.CancellationToken.IsSignalled then Exit;

  lCurrentFolder := ATask.Param['Folder'].AsInterface as IFolder;

  DoSomethingWithItemsInFolder(lCurrentFolder.Items);

  for lFolder in lCurrentFolder.Folders do
    begin
      if ATaks.CancellationToken.IsSignalled then Exit;
      CreateScanFolderTask(lFolder);
    end;
end;

begin
  GlobalOmniThreadPool.MaxExecuting := 8;
  CreateScanFolderTask(FRootFolder);

  // ??? wait for recursive scan to finish

  OutputResult();
end.

One example implementation for the wait that I have tried was this (based on an example found on About.com):

  while GlobalOmniThreadPool.CountExecuting + GlobalOmniThreadPool.CountQueued > 0 do
    Application.ProcessMessages;

But this appears to always exit immediately right after the "root thread" has finished. Even when I add an artificial delay using Sleep()-calls it still always exits too early. It seems that there occurs a "gap" between one task being struck off the list of executing tasks and the ones that were scheduled inside that task to be added to the list of queued tasks...

Actually, instead of waiting for the scan to finish, I would very much prefer to use an event handler (also, I'd rather not use Application.ProcessMessages as I will need this in form-less applications, too) and I already did try with both IOmniTaskControl.OnTerminated and using a TOmniEventMonitor but as these fire for every finished task I still somehow need to check whether the current one was the last one which again boils down to the same problem as above.

Or is there maybe a better way to create the tasks that would avoid this problem?

share|improve this question
    
I would make each task to wait for all child tasks it spawns to finish. Thus your root folder task will wait until all tasks digging down the tree have finished and only then will exit itself. –  Hristo Iliev Jun 21 '12 at 12:38
    
But I need the threads to finish before that happens so they are returned to the pool. If I had them wait around until all child threads have finished they never would because the child threads would not even start due to lack of available threads in the pool. –  Oliver Giesen Jun 21 '12 at 12:42
    
Sorry, didn't realise you were using thread pool. Can't you first traverse the directory structure, build a queue of directories and then start tasks that process the queue. Then you could just wait for the queue to become empty and for the thread pool to become idle. Or you could just copy some ideas from here. –  Hristo Iliev Jun 21 '12 at 12:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A simple way is to count 'folders to be processed' by yourself. Increment a value every time you create a folder task and decrement it every time a folder is processed.

var
  counter: TOmniCounter;

counter.Value := 0;

procedure ScanFolder(const ATask: IOmniTask);
var
  lFolder,
  lCurrentFolder: IFolder;
begin
  if ATaks.CancellationToken.IsSignalled then Exit;

  lCurrentFolder := ATask.Param['Folder'].AsInterface as IFolder;

  DoSomethingWithItemsInFolder(lCurrentFolder.Items);

  for lFolder in lCurrentFolder.Folders do
    begin
      if ATaks.CancellationToken.IsSignalled then Exit;
      counter.Increment;
      CreateScanFolderTask(lFolder);
    end;
  counter.Decrement;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
That appears to work nicely so far! :) However, I had to move the counter.increment into the CreateScanFolderTask routine as otherwise the initial root task would not be counted and so the counter was still 0 immediately after creating(/scheduling) the first task. –  Oliver Giesen Jun 21 '12 at 15:42
    
@OliverGiesen yes, of course. –  gabr Jun 21 '12 at 16:32

What I usually do is to count all the issued 'folderScan' objects out and count them back in again.

Each time a new TfolderScan is needed, the creating TfolderScan calls a factory for it The factory increments a CS-protected 'taskCount' as well as creating the TfolderScan. Every time a TfolderScan is completed, it calls the 'OnComplete' method of the factory that decrements the CS-protected 'taskCount'. If, in 'OnComplete', the count is decremeted to 0, there can be no TfolderScan left and the whole search most be complete. The thread that manages to decrement the count to 0 can do whatever is needed to signal the completion - PostMessage() a main form or call an 'OnSearchComplete' event.

share|improve this answer

Just as a side-note : Instead of checking (GlobalOmniThreadPool.CountExecuting + GlobalOmniThreadPool.CountQueued > 0) use (not GlobalOmniThreadPool.IsIdle). This hides implementation details and is more efficient.

share|improve this answer
    
I did try that and it had the same problem as the other approaches, i.e. it triggered too early, i.e. when the scan was still in progress (I still don't really understand why that is the case). The only thing that worked so far was the counter approach that gabr suggested (Martin's suggestion appears to be a slightly more sophisticated implementation of the same concept so I assume it would also work) - but only with the minor change I mentioned in my comment to that answer. –  Oliver Giesen Jun 22 '12 at 12:41
    
@OliverGiesen : My comment wasn't meant as a solution, just as a side-note that it would probably be better to use IsIdle (instead of re-implementing it yourself). This doesn't solve your question though, and I think you ran into a missing piece of functionality that could possibly be added to the OmniThread library in a generic way. –  PatrickvL Jun 26 '12 at 9:04
    
Fair enough. Also agree on the benefits of hiding implementation details. –  Oliver Giesen Jun 26 '12 at 16:35

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