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I'm writing a query and as I go along I'm analysing the SQL Profiler trace to monitor my query's performance and speed.

While doing this I noticed that if I run 3 different selects on the same table, these are much faster than if I ran them grouped in one select with OR's in the WHERE clause.

A)

SELECT * FROM navigation_trees nt  INNER JOIN contents c ON c.navigation_tree_id = nt.id WHERE nt.id = @NodeID

SELECT * FROM navigation_trees nt INNER JOIN contents c ON c.navigation_tree_id = nt.id WHERE nt.id = @ParentID

SELECT * FROM navigation_trees nt INNER JOIN contents c ON c.navigation_tree_id = nt.id WHERE nt.id IN (SELECT id FROM @ChildrenIDS)

B)

SELECT * FROM navigation_trees nt  INNER JOIN contents c ON c.navigation_tree_id = nt.id 
    WHERE 
        nt.id = @NodeID OR
        nt.id = @ParentID OR
        nt.id IN (SELECT id FROM @ChildrenIDS)

And here is the Profiler readings for the two queries:

CPU | Reads | Writes | Duration(ms)

A) 15 | 1095 | 0 | 26

B) 531 | 456139 | 0 | 541

Can you shed some light?

Many thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried showing plans for both queries? –  David Brabant Jun 21 '12 at 12:21
1  
Activate the execution plan in your SQL Studio and see the details. –  juergen d Jun 21 '12 at 12:23
    
how many records you have in tables. it will justify the Reads. –  Romil Jun 21 '12 at 12:25
2  
You could also try WHERE nt.id IN (SELECT @NodeID UNION ALL SELECT @ParentID UNION ALL SELECT id FROM @ChildrenIDS) –  Martin Smith Jun 21 '12 at 13:02
1  
You could also try adding OPTION (RECOMPILE) to the combined query. It may just have a more convoluted plan that is more vulnerable to the assumption that the cardinality of table variables is 0 –  Martin Smith Jun 21 '12 at 13:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Three selects are just three selects, A select with three conditions, joined by OR are actually selects plus the additional cost of removing duplicates.

If you're sure that there will never be duplicates, consider using UNION ALL rather than OR. Or course, that's a very general advice. When adjusting your queries only for the sake of performance, always refer to your execution plan to see that the specific piece of advice applies in your scenario.

share|improve this answer

I agree with David but wanted to put a code example in; those Or's are likely a killer. A basic rule i teach new developer is if you need an Or you need a union; which correlates with the other basic rule of filter early filter often. A query that filters on every join is ofttimes quicker than a filter that runs in a where clause as the optimiser can see better routes to reduce the data.

Your query may work like this or need other Union All.

Select
    *
From
(
    SELECT * 
    FROM 
        navigation_trees nt  
    WHERE 
        nt.id = @NodeID 

    union 
    SELECT 
        * 
    FROM 
        navigation_trees nt  
    WHERE 
        nt.id = @ParentID 

    union 
    SELECT 
        * 
    FROM 
        navigation_trees nt  
    WHERE
        nt.id IN (SELECT id FROM @ChildrenIDS)

) nt

INNER JOIN 
    contents c 
ON 
    c.navigation_tree_id = nt.id 
share|improve this answer

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