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I have a web application with two servlets and multiple mappings associated with each servlet, i.e.

web.xml:

<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>cheese</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/edam/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>cheese</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/cheddar/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>dog</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/poodle/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>
...

I would now like to apply Spring Security to this web application, with a different security configuration for each servlet. This is because the servlets have different authentication requirements. As such, I would expect just two filter mappings:

<filter-mapping>
    <filter-name>springSecurityFilterChainCheese</filter-name>
    <servlet-name>cheese</servlet-name>
</filter-mapping>
<filter-mapping>
    <filter-name>springSecurityFilterChainDog</filter-name>
    <servlet-name>dog</servlet-name>
</filter-mapping>

Using Spring Security 3.1, I am able to define multiple <http> elements, which looks like a good way to go. However, I cannot see how to specify a bean name for each <http> element or any other way of mapping the element to a servlet.

I know that I can specify a pattern attribute on <http>, but I would then need to repeat the servlet-to-URL mapping in my Spring Security configuration, which isn't DRY.

How can I map an <http> element to a specific servlet like this? Or will I need to expand out the <http> element and define all of my Spring Security beans myself?

share|improve this question

Not sure from your example but do you really need two filters?

Have you read http://static.springsource.org/spring-security/site/docs/3.1.x/reference/springsecurity-single.html#ns-minimal? That could give you a push in the right direction.

You can include multiple elements in a single element; would that work for you? I'm not aware of ny other way to do what you're asking. Just remember to put the most specific rules at the top as that's the order they'll be evaluated.

Sometimes you can't have a fully DRY solution, at least it's not code. If you're really concerned then use some mechanism such as Ant's to fill in the servlet name and pattern elements.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that was the accepted answer in stackoverflow.com/questions/8355593/… that I linked to above. My question was specifically looking for a way of naming the <http> elements so that I can link them to specific filters to make my URL-to-servlet mappings DRY. – Kkkev Jun 22 '12 at 8:11
    
Oops, I thought that was a hyperlink but when I clicked it on my tablet it didn't take me to a different pages so I figured it was only underlined text; different browser gives different results. – Thevenin Jun 22 '12 at 11:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Looking at the source code for Spring Security, it appears as though this could be possible by providing an id or name on the <http> element, but the Spring Security XML schema prevents this! I've raised https://jira.springsource.org/browse/SEC-1978 accordingly.

share|improve this answer
1  
My requested Spring Security issue was rejected as an edge case, so there is no solution to this. – Kkkev Jan 17 '13 at 15:07

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