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I am using pipe to write a coprocess. The parent creates two pipes, one pipe for write to the child and the other for read from child. But when I run the program, it is pending because it sets the printf to fully buffered as default. And I don't want to fflush the buffer in the child process source code.

I know the Chapter 19 in Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment introduced a way using pseudo-terminal. But I want to know if there is a more sample way to do it. Thanks to all.

Here is my source code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>


int main()
{
    #define MAXSIZE 1024

    char workload[MAXSIZE];
    char result[MAXSIZE];
    char buf[10] = {0};
    workload[strlen(workload)] = EOF;
    int workload_size = strlen(workload);

    int fd1[2], fd2[2];
    int n;
    pid_t pid;
    if (pipe(fd1) < 0 || pipe(fd2) < 0) {
        fprintf(stderr, "pipe error: %s\n", strerror(errno));
        exit(1);
    }

    if ((pid = fork()) < 0) {
        fprintf(stderr, "fork error: %s\n", strerror(errno));
        exit(1);
    } else if (pid > 0) {
        close(fd1[0]);
        close(fd2[1]);
        while(fgets(workload, MAXSIZE, stdin) != NULL)
        {
            workload_size = strlen(workload);
            if (write(fd1[1], workload, workload_size) != workload_size) {
                fprintf(stderr, "write to pipe error: %s\n", strerror(errno));
                exit(1);
            }

            if ((n = read(fd2[0], result, MAXSIZE)) < 0) {
                fprintf(stderr, "read from pipe error: %s\n", strerror(errno));
                exit(1);
            }

            if (n == 0) {
                fprintf(stderr, "child closed the pipe\n");
                exit(1);
            }

            result[n] = 0;

            if (puts(result) == EOF) {
                fprintf(stderr, "fputs error\n");
                exit(1);
            }
        }
    } else {
        close(fd1[1]);
        close(fd2[0]);
        if (fd1[0] != STDIN_FILENO) {
            if (dup2(fd1[0] ,STDIN_FILENO) != STDIN_FILENO) {
                fprintf(stderr, "dup2 error to stdin.\n");
                exit(1);
            }
            close(fd1[0]);
        }
        if (fd2[1] != STDOUT_FILENO) {
            if (dup2(fd2[1] ,STDOUT_FILENO) != STDOUT_FILENO) {
                fprintf(stderr, "dup2 error to stdout.\n");
                exit(1);
            }
            close(fd2[1]);
        }

        if (execl("./a.out", "a.out", NULL) < 0) {
            fprintf(stderr, "execl error: %s\n", strerror(errno));
            exit(1);
        }
        exit(0);
    }

    return 0;
}

The child process just read from standard input and output it:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    #define MAXSIZE 1024
    char x[MAXSIZE];
    int n;
    while(fgets(x, 1024, stdin) != NULL)
    {
        printf("%s", x);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use stdbuf utility to change the buffering of your child process.

Or, if you can change the code of the child process, call setvbuf directly from the child process.

share|improve this answer
    
It's really a neat way. Thank you! –  Bin Wang Jun 21 '12 at 12:45
    
And I'm wonder if I could change the buffering of pipe directly in the source code? –  Bin Wang Jun 21 '12 at 13:17
    
updated, use setvbuf –  Maxim Egorushkin Jun 21 '12 at 13:23
    
I tried to use setvbuf to set the child process's buffer. But it did not work. I add these code before execl: setvbuf(stdout, NULL, _IOLBF, 0); –  Bin Wang Jun 21 '12 at 13:38
    
That won't work before execl. setvbuf needs to be called from the child process. –  Maxim Egorushkin Jun 21 '12 at 13:48

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