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Please see the code snippet below :

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
uint32_t len, x;
char abc[] = "12345678";
uint8_t *ptr = (uint8_t *)abc;
copy(ptr, ptr + 4, reinterpret_cast<uint32_t*>(&len));
cout << " len: " << len << endl;
} 

The output is 49! I would want the output to be 1234. Am I missing something

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3  
ahem … you are copying a string byte-by-byte into an integer and are confused that it doesn’t work? –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 21 '12 at 12:44
1  
Why not just use a string->int conversion that's readable and works? –  chris Jun 21 '12 at 12:44
    
This is just a sample.. I actually need it to do like this in the actual code –  Nikhil Jun 21 '12 at 12:45
1  
Well, '1' != 1 and so forth. That's what you seem to be expecting. –  chris Jun 21 '12 at 12:46
1  
49 is the ASCII representation of the character '1'. You are copying chars to an integer. Don't mix that unless you know what you are doing. –  Fèlix Galindo Allué Jun 21 '12 at 12:48
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your target is a “container” of length 1 (namely, a single object, len).

You are copying four subsequent byte values into this container, which of course fails – in particular, it causes an overflow since the target only has space for a single element.

Other errors in your code (not an exhaustive list):

  • You are confusing character codes and their string representation
  • You are performing redundant casts

The first point in particular is relevant since what you actually want to do is parse the number encoded in the first four characters of the string as a decimal number. But what you actually do is copy its character codes.

To parse a number in C++, use as std::stringstream or, since C++11, std::stoi

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1  
Or, might I add, stoi –  chris Jun 21 '12 at 12:47
    
@chris Yes, since C++11. But worth adding. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 21 '12 at 12:48
    
It's halfway through 2012. How many years before the 2011 version settles in? :/ –  chris Jun 21 '12 at 13:00
    
@chris If the decision was made by me – immediately. But that’s unfortunately not how it works. But yes, I share the opinion that we should just assume C++11 here on SO. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 21 '12 at 13:16
    
@chris: I cannot tell you everywhere else, but where I work, where we have true portable code that must compile with VS (2005 onwards), g++ (4.1 onwards), Solaris CC, IBM xlCr, HPUX aCC... It might take us a few years, maybe by the time we get a newer standard. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 21 '12 at 13:28
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std:copy doesn't work as you're expecting. It copies the source 'element-wise' to the destination. So it copies the first uint8 (= char '1' == 0x49 in hex) to 'len', and then proceeds to trample on three random uint32 values following on in memory.

This this instead to see what's actually happening.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
  uint32_t len[4];
  char abc[] = "12345678";
  copy(abc, &abc[4], &len[0]);
  cout << " len: " << len[0] << " " <<len[1] << " " << len[2] << " " << len[3] << endl;
} 
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First of all, std::copy does roughly this:

template <typename InputItr, typename OutputItr>
void copy(InputItr begin, InputItr end, OutputItr obegin)
{
    while (begin != end)
        *obegin++ = *begin++;
}

Your output iterator is uint32_t*, which would actually cause you to overwrite 4 32-bit words! (buffer overflow). You are seeing 49 because the first character that is copied ('1') has the ASCII value 49.

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