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A website I've been working on will not match data using a PHP (preg_match) regex pattern that seems to work everywhere else I've tested it. That pattern is:

<channel.*?>(.*?)</channel>

It is matched against an RSS feed that has a channel tag.

Now the server I am working on will only produce the correct result if change it to:

<channel.*?>(.*)?</channel>

My regex isn't the best in the world so I'm wondering if anyone can tell me if there is any significant difference between the two patterns.

Small note: I realize it would probably be better to use SimpleXML etc, but this regex is from a previous application and for various reasons I am not allowed to change it.

Thanks in advance for any insights.

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2  
Is ' your PCRE delimiter? If so, the s modifier may or may not make a difference (I'm not entirely sure). –  BoltClock Jun 21 '12 at 13:56
    
Yes ' is the PCRE delimiter. It was used by whoever wrote the code originally, normally use # or ~. –  Vunus Jun 22 '12 at 14:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The statement (.*) says "the selection is zero or more characters" and the trailing ? makes it an optional match. By contrast, (.*?) is using a "lazy star" ( *? ) which first attempts to skip the match completely. Check this for more information.

To understand the difference between a normal (greedy) star and a lazy star, look at the following example in PHP and notice that the greedy star makes the largest match it can with the pattern it is given, while the lazy star "gives up" as soon as it has satisfied the match pattern:

$inputs = array( 'axb' , 'axxxb' , 'axbxb' , 'axbxxxb' );

// GREEDY STAR (NORMAL)
foreach( $inputs as $input )
{
  preg_match( '/a.*b/' , $input , $greedy );
  $greedy_matches[] = $greedy[0];
}

print "<pre>";
print_r( $greedy_matches );
print "</pre>";
/* 
Array
(
    [0] => axb
    [1] => axxxb
    [2] => axbxb
    [3] => axbxxxb
)
*/



// LAZY STAR
foreach( $inputs as $input )
{
  preg_match( '/a.*?b/' , $input , $lazy );
  $lazy_matches[] = $lazy[0];
}

print "<pre>";
print_r( $lazy_matches );
print "</pre>";
/* 
Array
(
    [0] => axb
    [1] => axxxb
    [2] => axb
    [3] => axb
)
*/
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. That's helped a huge amount (thanks to everyone who answered). One small question I have though is that the code that was originally there (.*?) seems to work fine everywhere, including my own server, but this single server seems to only work consistently with (.*)?. Is that because of the "lazy star" or could it be there something odd about that server & it's regex matching? –  Vunus Jun 22 '12 at 14:45
    
Lazy star comes from Perl, IIRC, so it may be the case that this particular server is using a regex library that doesn't have lazy star implemented. –  Andrew Kozak Jun 22 '12 at 14:51
    
Just checked & it does have a different version of perl to my version so that's got to be the best explanation I've heard. Thanks. –  Vunus Jun 22 '12 at 17:05
    
To check for sure, you could try to match the pattern /a.*?b/ against the inputs axb and axbxb. A normal (greedy) star will match the entire string in both examples, but a lazy star would only match axb for both. I've expanded my answer with an example. –  Andrew Kozak Jun 22 '12 at 18:31
    
Thanks for expanding your answer. That definitely explains things. I no longer have access to the server, but this is the 3rd time I've come across it so will definitely check it out the next time it happens. –  Vunus Jun 23 '12 at 19:40

My guess is that you do not actually want the operator itself to be lazy. A lazy operator will generally try to match as little as possible, which may well give unexpected results when dealing with a lot of data that might be irregular. By placing the question mark at the end of the greedy group you add an optional match to the greedy group, as opposed to making the group non-greedy (lazy). If you want to read more about the distinction between greediness and laziness check this out: http://www.regular-expressions.info/possessive.html.

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Please provide an example of text you are trying to match against.

'<channel.*' will match anything starting with <channel

'?>' will match a single character followed by > (so '1>', '2>', 'b>' etc)

if you want to match everything between just use pattern

'#<channel>(.*)</channel>#'
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In regular expressions, * means 0 or more times - there is no need to add ? after it.

EDIT: as I now understand from the comments, greedy makes difference. A little test case:

var_dump(preg_replace('/<channel.*?>(.*?).*<\/channel>/', '$1', '<channel>asd</channel>'));
var_dump(preg_replace('/<channel.*?>(.*)?.*<\/channel>/', '$1', '<channel>asd</channel>'));

Outputs

string(0) ""
string(3) "asd"

As you see, I am using (.*?).* and (.*)?.*, so that being greedy would make the difference. But, as it's not the same, in the given example I don't see how it could make the difference.

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3  
*? is an ungreedy zero-or-more quantifier. –  Niet the Dark Absol Jun 21 '12 at 14:01

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