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Can JavaScript classes/objects have constructors? How are they created?

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1  
18  
new link –  Guillaume Massé Apr 19 '12 at 4:49

14 Answers 14

up vote 256 down vote accepted

Using prototypes:

function Box(color) // Constructor
{
    this.color = color;
}

Box.prototype.getColor = function()
{
    return this.color;
}

Hiding "color" (somewhat resembles a private member variable):

function Box(col)
{
   var color = col;

   this.getColor = function()
   {
       return color;
   }
}

Usage:

var blueBox = new Box("blue");
alert(blueBox.getColor()); // will alert blue

var greenBox = new Box("green");
alert(greenBox.getColor()); // will alert green
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2  
@BorisB, yes you do - this defines color and getColor on the Box object, otherwise you're assigning variables in the usual scope. –  Nick Jun 15 '12 at 16:23
3  
@Jeach yes it does. I've provided an alternative snippet that hides color. I'd suggest which you use is largely down to personal preference (protection vs. simplicity) –  Nick Jun 24 '12 at 12:43
3  
@CamiloMartin Although not always necessary, making a variable "private" (or in this case, unnameable) can be a useful way to prevent external code becoming dependent on the implementation details of your class. Even just the indication of which elements of the class are public/private can be useful to external users. –  Nick Sep 18 '12 at 21:39
20  
var makes a private variable. this makes a public variable –  EhevuTov Sep 29 '12 at 16:09
3  
@AlanKis (At least in some Javascript engines) the stack trace will in the anonymous function case not even mention Foo, while in the latter case it will know that it's Foo being called. Very helpful for debugging. –  Joachim Isaksson Oct 21 '13 at 11:36

Here's a template I sometimes use for OOP-similar behavior in JavaScript. As you can see, you can simulate private (both static and instance) members using closures. What new MyClass() will return is an object with only the properties assigned to the this object and in the prototype object of the "class."

var MyClass = (function () {
    // private static
    var nextId = 1;

    // constructor
    var cls = function () {
        // private
        var id = nextId++;
        var name = 'Unknown';

        // public (this instance only)
        this.get_id = function () { return id; };

        this.get_name = function () { return name; };
        this.set_name = function (value) {
            if (typeof value != 'string')
                throw 'Name must be a string';
            if (value.length < 2 || value.length > 20)
                throw 'Name must be 2-20 characters long.';
            name = value;
        };
    };

    // public static
    cls.get_nextId = function () {
        return nextId;
    };

    // public (shared across instances)
    cls.prototype = {
        announce: function () {
            alert('Hi there! My id is ' + this.get_id() + ' and my name is "' + this.get_name() + '"!\r\n' +
                  'The next fellow\'s id will be ' + MyClass.get_nextId() + '!');
        }
    };

    return cls;
})();

I've been asked about inheritance using this pattern, so here goes:

// It's a good idea to have a utility class to wire up inheritance.
function inherit(cls, superCls) {
    // We use an intermediary empty constructor to create an
    // inheritance chain, because using the super class' constructor
    // might have side effects.
    var construct = function () {};
    construct.prototype = superCls.prototype;
    cls.prototype = new construct;
    cls.prototype.constructor = cls;
    cls.super = superCls;
}

var MyChildClass = (function () {
    // constructor
    var cls = function (surName) {
        // Call super constructor on this instance (any arguments
        // to the constructor would go after "this" in call(…)).
        this.constructor.super.call(this);

        // Shadowing instance properties is a little bit less
        // intuitive, but can be done:
        var getName = this.get_name;

        // public (this instance only)
        this.get_name = function () {
            return getName.call(this) + ' ' + surName;
        };
    };
    inherit(cls, MyClass); // <-- important!

    return cls;
})();

And an example to use it all:

var bob = new MyClass();
bob.set_name('Bob');
bob.announce(); // id is 1, name shows as "Bob"

var john = new MyChildClass('Doe');
john.set_name('John');
john.announce(); // id is 2, name shows as "John Doe"

alert(john instanceof MyClass); // true

As you can see, the classes correctly interact with each other (they share the static id from MyClass, the announce method uses the correct get_name method, etc.)

One thing to note is the need to shadow instance properties. You can actually make the inherit function go through all instance properties (using hasOwnProperty) that are functions, and automagically add a super_<method name> property. This would let you call this.super_get_name() instead of storing it in a temporary value and calling it bound using call.

For methods on the prototype you don't need to worry about the above though, if you want to access the super class' prototype methods, you can just call this.constructor.super.prototype.methodName. If you want to make it less verbose you can of course add convenience properties. :)

share|improve this answer
7  
Just a note about the cls.prototype part: "shared across instances" is only for reading the value (calling announce). If you set myClassInstance.announce to another value, it creates a new property in myClassInstance, so it only applies to that object, not other instances of the class. Assigning to MyClass.prototype.announce will affect all instances though. –  Matthew Crumley Jul 11 '09 at 18:55
3  
@Blixt - have used your example extensively - thanks! –  cc young Jul 20 '11 at 13:12
1  
No problem, glad to be of help! :) –  Blixt Jul 20 '11 at 18:50
2  
Thank you! Very Liked! Could you show example of class inheritance in this approach. –  Dmitrij Golubev Oct 15 '12 at 11:29
2  
@DmitrijGolubev, Brad Dwyer, and Nathan C. Tresch: I've added inheritance, but it's getting pretty complicated so I would usually advice you to go with a simpler solution, unless you need such hardcore inheritance in JavaScript (which is really just a prototypal language). –  Blixt Nov 27 '12 at 18:37

It seems to me most of you are giving example of getters and setters not a constructor, ie http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constructor_(object-oriented_programming).

lunched-dan was closer but the example didn't work in jsFiddle.

This example creates a private constructor function that only runs during the creation of the object.

var color = 'black';

function Box()
{
   // private property
   var color = '';

   // private constructor 
   var __construct = function() {
       alert("Object Created.");
       color = 'green';
   }()

   // getter
   this.getColor = function() {
       return color;
   }

   // setter
   this.setColor = function(data) {
       color = data;
   }

}

var b = new Box();

alert(b.getColor()); // should be green

b.setColor('orange');

alert(b.getColor()); // should be orange

alert(color); // should be black

If you wanted to assign public properties then the constructor could be defined as such:

var color = 'black';

function Box()
{
   // public property
   this.color = '';

   // private constructor 
   var __construct = function(that) {
       alert("Object Created.");
       that.color = 'green';
   }(this)

   // getter
   this.getColor = function() {
       return this.color;
   }

   // setter
   this.setColor = function(color) {
       this.color = color;
   }

}

var b = new Box();

alert(b.getColor()); // should be green

b.setColor('orange'); 

alert(b.getColor()); // should be orange

alert(color); // should be black
share|improve this answer
22  
How is this not the #1 answer? Only Jon created a constructor with parameters. –  Rap Aug 30 '12 at 14:29
1  
Is there any way we can get an example of inheritance using this paradigm for constructors? –  Nathan C. Tresch Nov 26 '12 at 22:26
1  
@Rap Jon's constructor example has no parameters as it is Box() function :) . But this example as well as examples in the other answers can be easy extended to accept parameters. –  Alexander Stepaniuk Dec 31 '12 at 18:28
2  
@AndersonGreen you can add a parameter to Box and then pass it to the private constructor as a function parameter. –  Gautham C. Aug 12 '13 at 16:22
1  
epic answer, yours should be top! thanks for the constructor –  pythonian29033 Sep 19 '13 at 10:08

So what is the point of "constructor" property? Cannot figure out where it could be useful, any ideas?

The point of the constructor property is to provide some way of pretending JavaScript has classes. One of the things you cannot usefully do is change an object's constructor after it's been created. It's complicated.

I wrote a fairly comprehensive piece on it a few years ago: http://joost.zeekat.nl/constructors-considered-mildly-confusing.html

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Hi! Thanks for the article. That's more clear now. –  igor May 10 '11 at 10:03

Example here: http://jsfiddle.net/FZ5nC/

Try this template:

<script>
//============================================================
// Register Namespace
//------------------------------------------------------------
var Name = Name||{};
Name.Space = Name.Space||{};

//============================================================
// Constructor - MUST BE AT TOP OF FILE
//------------------------------------------------------------
Name.Space.ClassName = function Name_Space_ClassName(){}

//============================================================
// Member Functions & Variables
//------------------------------------------------------------
Name.Space.ClassName.prototype = {
  v1: null
 ,v2: null
 ,f1: function Name_Space_ClassName_f1(){}
}

//============================================================
// Static Variables
//------------------------------------------------------------
Name.Space.ClassName.staticVar = 0;

//============================================================
// Static Functions
//------------------------------------------------------------
Name.Space.ClassName.staticFunc = function Name_Space_ClassName_staticFunc(){
}
</script>

You must adjust your namespace if you are defining a static class:

<script>
//============================================================
// Register Namespace
//------------------------------------------------------------
var Shape = Shape||{};
Shape.Rectangle = Shape.Rectangle||{};
// In previous example, Rectangle was defined in the constructor.
</script>

Example class:

<script>
//============================================================
// Register Namespace
//------------------------------------------------------------
var Shape = Shape||{};

//============================================================
// Constructor - MUST BE AT TOP OF FILE
//------------------------------------------------------------
Shape.Rectangle = function Shape_Rectangle(width, height, color){
    this.Width = width;
    this.Height = height;
    this.Color = color;
}

//============================================================
// Member Functions & Variables
//------------------------------------------------------------
Shape.Rectangle.prototype = {
  Width: null
 ,Height: null
 ,Color: null
 ,Draw: function Shape_Rectangle_Draw(canvasId, x, y){
    var canvas = document.getElementById(canvasId);
    var context = canvas.getContext("2d");
    context.fillStyle = this.Color;
    context.fillRect(x, y, this.Width, this.Height);
 }
}

//============================================================
// Static Variables
//------------------------------------------------------------
Shape.Rectangle.Sides = 4;

//============================================================
// Static Functions
//------------------------------------------------------------
Shape.Rectangle.CreateSmallBlue = function Shape_Rectangle_CreateSmallBlue(){
    return new Shape.Rectangle(5,8,'#0000ff');
}
Shape.Rectangle.CreateBigRed = function Shape_Rectangle_CreateBigRed(){
    return new Shape.Rectangle(50,25,'#ff0000');
}
</script>

Example instantiation:

<canvas id="painting" width="500" height="500"></canvas>
<script>
alert("A rectangle has "+Shape.Rectangle.Sides+" sides.");

var r1 = new Shape.Rectangle(16, 12, "#aa22cc");
r1.Draw("painting",0, 20);

var r2 = Shape.Rectangle.CreateSmallBlue();
r2.Draw("painting", 0, 0);

Shape.Rectangle.CreateBigRed().Draw("painting", 10, 0);
</script>

Notice functions are defined as A.B = function A_B(). This is to make your script easier to debug. Open Chrome's Inspect Element panel, run this script, and expand the debug backtrace:

<script>
//============================================================
// Register Namespace
//------------------------------------------------------------
var Fail = Fail||{};

//============================================================
// Static Functions
//------------------------------------------------------------
Fail.Test = function Fail_Test(){
    A.Func.That.Does.Not.Exist();
}

Fail.Test();
</script>
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3  
Can you give an explanation of how this works? –  Cody Guldner May 25 '13 at 4:20
    
Example added. Also added information on improving debug output. –  bitlather May 26 '13 at 2:21
    
Can someone please explain the down votes? –  bitlather Aug 28 '13 at 13:38
1  
Probably because it adds a needless level of complexity to the problem. It's hard to find the answer in your post because of the pedantic name spacing and static class declaration. Don't get me wrong, it's good information but it's certainly more confusing than helpful if you are trying to get a foot in the door on understanding. I'm halfway competent in JS and I barely understand what you're doing here, or why it's relevant to "How do I constructor?" –  Bmo Sep 20 '13 at 18:28
1  
Thanks for the insight, Bmo. It was a lengthy post, but it's because I don't understand the use of a constructor if it's not tied to a well defined object and static class implementation. When learning C++ or Java, you have to learn how to implement classes alongside how to implement constructors. Web dev has become much more enjoyable ever since I stumbled upon this method of writing javascript, and I just wanted to share. I moved the fiddle up to the top so it's easier to find. I hope that will clarify any confusion. –  bitlather Sep 30 '13 at 0:23

This is a constructor:

function MyClass() {}

When you do

var myObj = new MyClass();

MyClass is executed, and a new object is returned of that class.

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1  
To clarify, what this means is at the top of your class you can say alert(valuePassedInAsArgument); and this will run once for each instantiation, so the whole class is the constructor itself. –  Martin Lyne Nov 8 '12 at 15:19

I guess I'll post what I do with javascript closure since no one is using closure yet.

var user = function(id) {
  // private properties & methods goes here.
  var someValue;
  function doSomething(data) {
    someValue = data;
  };

  // constructor goes here.
  if (!id) return null;

  // public properties & methods goes here.
  return {
    id: id,
    method: function(params) {
      doSomething(params);
    }
  };
};

Comments and suggestions to this solution are welcome. :)

share|improve this answer
1  
A couple comments: 1) statement if (!id) is not safe, values like 0 or false will cause it to evaluate true and return null. I'm guessing you want to check for undefined or null in which case === null and === undefined would be better. 2) This more closely resembles the Module pattern (adequatelygood.com/2010/3/JavaScript-Module-Pattern-In-Depth) versus a constructor, the difference being a Module returns an Object from the function whereas a constructor creates an object when paired with the new keyword, and in that case you would be setting values on 'this' instead of an object. –  Rich Feb 25 '13 at 20:30

I found this tutorial very useful. This approach is used by most of jQuery plug-ins.

http://www.htmlgoodies.com/html5/tutorials/create-an-object-oriented-javascript-class-constructor.html#fbid=OVYAQL_TDpK

var Class = function(methods) {   
    var klass = function() {    
        this.initialize.apply(this, arguments);          
    };  

    for (var property in methods) { 
       klass.prototype[property] = methods[property];
    }

    if (!klass.prototype.initialize) klass.prototype.initialize = function(){};      

    return klass;    
};

Now ,

var Person = Class({ 
    initialize: function(name, age) {
        this.name = name;
        this.age  = age;
    },
    toString: function() {
        return "My name is "+this.name+" and I am "+this.age+" years old.";
    }
}); 

var alice = new Person('Alice', 26);
alert(alice.name); //displays "Alice"
alert(alice.age); //displays "26"
alert(alice.toString()); //displays "My name is Alice and I am 26 years old" in most browsers.
//IE 8 and below display the Object's toString() instead! "[Object object]"
share|improve this answer
6  
I cringe whenever i see people using klass –  Madbreaks May 31 '13 at 21:24

Using Nick's sample above, you can create a constructor for objects without parameters using a return statement as the last statement in your object definition. Return your constructor function as below and it will run the code in __construct each time you create the object:

function Box()
{
   var __construct = function() {
       alert("Object Created.");
       this.color = 'green';
   }

  this.color = '';

   this.getColor = function() {
       return this.color;
   }

   __construct();
}

var b = new Box();
share|improve this answer
1  
You're not returning the constructor function, you're just calling it. –  David Conrad Jun 6 '13 at 16:55
    
If you try to use this.getColor(); on the line above alert("Object Created."); nothing will be alerted. There'll be an error like "getColor is not defined". If you want construct to be able to call other methods in the object it needs to be defined after all the other methods. So instead of calling __construct(); on the last line just define construct down there and put () after it to force it to auto-execute. –  thinsoldier Jun 13 '13 at 17:14
    
Correction. Adding () to the end of the __construct definition still resulted in the error. I had to call __construct(); on its own line like in the original code to avoid the error. –  thinsoldier Jun 13 '13 at 17:28

This pattern has served me well. With this pattern, you create classes in separate files, load them into your overall app "as needed".

// Namespace
// (Creating new if not instantiated yet, otherwise, use existing and just add to it)
var myApp = myApp || {};

// "Package" 
// Similar to how you would establish a package in other languages
(function() {

// "Class"
var MyClass = function(params) {
    this.initialize(params);
}

    // "Global" vars (all instances);
    MyClass.counter = 0;

    // "Private" vars
var p = MyClass.prototype;

    p.id = null;
    p.firstname = null;
    p.lastname = null;

    p.initialize = function(params){
        this.id = MyClass.counter++;
        this.firstname = params.firstname;
        this.lastname = params.lastname;
    }

    p.doAlert = function(theMessage){
        alert(this.firstname + " " + this.lastname + " said: " + theMessage + ". My id:" + this.id);
    }


// Assign class to app
myApp.MyClass = MyClass;

// Close the "Package"
}());

// Usage example:
var bob = new myApp.MyClass({   firstname   :   "bob",
                                lastname    :   "er"
                            });

bob.doAlert("hello there");
share|improve this answer
    
Those are instance variables but they have "public" accessibility, not "private" as in C++ or Java. –  Potatoswatter Dec 7 '12 at 16:05
    
How would you go about creating a private variable (in the classic sense) that is relative to the instance, but not common common to all instances? –  bob Jan 9 '13 at 8:31
    
See Douglas Crockford's site, he's one of the language designers and a foremost authority. I don't always follow his patterns, but in general a private variable is a local var in the constructor (or function argument, or in a constructor-like function). –  Potatoswatter Jan 9 '13 at 8:34
    
Thanks for the tip... the following page explains what I was looking for: javascript.crockford.com/private.html –  bob Jan 9 '13 at 8:53
    
Oh, sorry for not testing the link :P –  Potatoswatter Jan 9 '13 at 9:40

They do if you use Typescript - open source from MicroSoft :-)

class BankAccount {
 balance: number;
 constructor(initially: number) {
 this.balance = initially;
 }
 deposit(credit: number) {
 this.balance += credit;
 return this.balance;
 }
}

Typescript lets you 'fake' OO constructs that are compiled into javascript constructs. If you're starting a large project it may save you a lot of time and it just reached milestone 1.0 version.

http://www.typescriptlang.org/Content/TypeScript%20Language%20Specification.pdf

The above code gets 'compiled' to :

var BankAccount = (function () {
    function BankAccount(initially) {
        this.balance = initially;
    }
    BankAccount.prototype.deposit = function (credit) {
        this.balance += credit;
        return this.balance;
    };
    return BankAccount;
})();
share|improve this answer
    
I'm working on a large project and I'm trying to convince people that TypeScript will give us a running shoot. We'll see how that goes. –  wootscootinboogie May 23 at 12:29
    
@wootscootinboogie In one day (ending at 5.30am right now) I've got pretty far and pretty comfortable with it. I strongly recommend reading the spec through and while you can skip half of the real nitty gritty stuff you're doing yourself a favor reading it through at least once. this guy's videos are excellent youtube.com/user/basaratali/videos. good luck ) –  Simon_Weaver May 23 at 12:31

While using Blixt's great template from above, I found out that it doesn't work well with multi-level inheritance (MyGrandChildClass extending MyChildClass extending MyClass) – it cycles on calling first parent's constructor over and over. So here is a simple workaround – if you need multi-level inheritance, instead of using this.constructor.super.call(this, surName); use chainSuper(this).call(this, surName); with the chain function defined like this:

function chainSuper(cls) {
  if (cls.__depth == undefined) cls.__depth = 1; else cls.__depth++;
  var depth = cls.__depth;
  var sup = cls.constructor.super;
  while (depth > 1) {
    if (sup.super != undefined) sup = sup.super;
    depth--;
  }
  return sup;
}
share|improve this answer

http://www.jsoops.net/ is quite good for oop in Js. If provide private, protected, public variable and function, and also Inheritance feature. Example Code:

var ClassA = JsOops(function (pri, pro, pub)
{// pri = private, pro = protected, pub = public

    pri.className = "I am A ";

    this.init = function (var1)// constructor
    {
        pri.className += var1;
    }

    pub.getData = function ()
    {
        return "ClassA(Top=" + pro.getClassName() + ", This=" + pri.getClassName()
        + ", ID=" + pro.getClassId() + ")";
    }

    pri.getClassName = function () { return pri.className; }
    pro.getClassName = function () { return pri.className; }
    pro.getClassId = function () { return 1; }
});

var newA = new ClassA("Class");

//***Access public function
console.log(typeof (newA.getData));
// function
console.log(newA.getData());
// ClassA(Top=I am A Class, This=I am A Class, ID=1)

//***You can not access constructor, private and protected function
console.log(typeof (newA.init));            // undefined
console.log(typeof (newA.className));       // undefined
console.log(typeof (newA.pro));             // undefined
console.log(typeof (newA.getClassName));    // undefined
share|improve this answer

just to offer up some variety. ds.oop is a nice way to declare classes with constructors in javascript. It supports every possible type of inheritance (Including 1 type that even c# does not support) as well as Interfaces which is nice.

var Color = ds.make.class({
    type: 'Color',
    constructor: function (r,g,b) { 
        this.r = r;                     /* now r,g, and b are available to   */
        this.g = g;                     /* other methods in the Color class  */
        this.b = b;                     
    }
});
var red = new Color(255,0,0);   // using the new keyword to instantiate the class
share|improve this answer

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