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I wrote this code which is working fine but everytime the output is the same. So nothing random about it. Curious to know why! Assumptions: 33 students First row : 7 students 2nd row : 9 students 3rd row : 9 students 4th row : 8 students

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

int main() {
   vector<int> random;

   for (int i = 1; i < 34; i++)
      random.push_back(i);

   random_shuffle(random.begin(), random.end());

   for (int i = 1; i < 8; i++)
      cout << random[i] << " " ;
   cout << endl;

   int i = 7;
   int num_seats = 1;

   for (int j = 1; j <=3; j++) {
      while (num_seats < 10 && i < 33) {
         cout << random[i++] << " " ;
         num_seats++;
      }
      cout << endl;
      num_seats = 1;
   }
}
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Just so you know, C++11 has an iota function that can save you from filling your vector with consecutive numbers. –  chris Jun 21 '12 at 15:02
2  
Did you provide a random seed to the random number generator you use? –  Veger Jun 21 '12 at 15:05
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You need to initialise the random number generator first. Random number generation depends on a "seed value". To have a unique seed value every time your program is executed, you can rely on the current time. time(NULL) returns the number of seconds which represents the current time -- which can be that unique seed.

Try adding this in the first line inside main()

srand(unsigned(time(NULL)));
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Correct, but a little explanation of why his "problem" exists in the first place might be helpful –  ltjax Jun 21 '12 at 15:05
    
@Itjax: At the risk of sounding like a clairvoyant, I'd wager that's the point of this particular section of the curriculum (that is, to teach how PRNG works). –  Justin ᚅᚔᚈᚄᚒᚔ Jun 21 '12 at 15:09
1  
It's not actually specified that random_shuffle uses rand() as a source of randomness, so this isn't necessarily portable. –  bames53 Jun 21 '12 at 15:12
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The random_shuffle() overload you use accesses an unspecified source of randomness. It's almost certainly using rand(), which would mean you'd need to use srand() to seed it to get varying random shuffles.

However a more portable solution would be to specify a source of randomness so you don't have to just assume rand() is used. If your implementation is C++11 then the best option is to use shuffle() and an engine from the <random> library:

#include <random>
#include <algorithm>

#include <vector>
#include <numeric>
#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    std::vector<int> v(34);
    iota(begin(v),end(v),1);

    std::mt19937_64 eng((std::random_device()()));
    shuffle(begin(v),end(v),eng);

    copy(begin(v),end(v),std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout," "));
    std::cout << '\n';
}

Absent C++11 you can use the random_shuffle() overload that takes a random number generator, so that the program portably specifies the source of randomness:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
#include <algorithm>

#include <vector>
#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>

struct RNG {
    int operator() (int n) {
        return static_cast<int>(std::rand()/(static_cast<double>(RAND_MAX)+1) * n);
    }
};

int main() {
    std::vector<int> v(34);
    for (int i=0;i<v.size();++i)
        v[i] = i+1;

    std::srand(std::time(NULL));
    random_shuffle(v.begin(),v.end(),RNG());

    copy(v.begin(),v.end(),std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout," "));
    std::cout << '\n';
}
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+1, but if you are using C++11, why don't you use {} to avoid most-vexing parse instead of the extra (). It also keeps the difference between random_device construction and calling more clear. –  KillianDS Jun 21 '12 at 16:00
    
@KillianDS I considered it, however I decided to make my example support some popular compilers that haven't yet implemented generalized initialization syntax but which do have the necessary C++11 library components. –  bames53 Jun 21 '12 at 16:20
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