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I have a quick question about ARC in iOS. (Sorry I've asked so many of these types of questions, but I'm just sooo confused regarding memory management.). It's important to note that I've never used the old memory maintenance system (retain, release, assign...etc) so I don't really know what those terms mean.

Right now I'm confused regarding what I have to do to make sure that strong properties get released properly. For example, suppose I'm making a school app and my School object contains strong property references to 5 different Child objects (not in an array). Each Child object has a strong pointer (property) to a Book object.

If I remove one of the Child objects from my school (say by making its property = nil, or by changing my property to point at a new object), will its Book be properly released? What do I have to do to make sure that this is the case? Do I need to write self.myBook = nil in a dealloc method? What if Child was a View Controller, would I need to write self.myBook = nil in the viewDidUnload method?

I'm targeting only iOS 5 (and up) so the old way of memory management doesn't really matter to me.

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I suggest you read this: clang.llvm.org/docs/AutomaticReferenceCounting.html –  Richard J. Ross III Jun 21 '12 at 15:41
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I'll take a look at it. –  Nosrettap Jun 21 '12 at 15:50

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If I remove one of the Child objects from my school (say by making its property = nil, or by changing my property to point at a new object), will its Book be properly released?

Yes, it will be released as long as there are no other strong references to it.

What do I have to do to make sure that this is the case?

Nothing in particular: ARC will decrement object's reference count when you set the reference to that object to nil, see that the object is no longer referenced, and proceed to deleting it. It is smart enough to deal with the items referenced from the object being deleted, recursively, so you are not going to leak any memory.

One thing you have to worry about is circular references: if your Book has a strong back-reference to Child, either make that reference weak, or clear it out at the same time as you set your reference of Book to nil (the second option is error-prone, and therefore is not recommended).

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Would you say then that for the most part, the only time to use weak properties is for outlets and to avoid circular dependencies? –  Nosrettap Jun 21 '12 at 15:53
    
@Nosrettap Avoiding circular references and to some extent, caching, are the two "umbrella cases" covering the use of weak properties. An important special case worth mentioning separately is properties that represent delegates: with the notable exception of CAAnimation, all delegate properties are weak to avoid creating retain cycles. –  dasblinkenlight Jun 21 '12 at 16:11
    
If there is a reference cycle, he can not 'clear it out in -dealloc", because dealloc will never be called! (Unless it's the dealloc of a method owning both members of the cycle) –  NicolasMiari Jun 21 '12 at 16:41
    
@ranReloaded You are absolutely right, I corrected that last paragraph. –  dasblinkenlight Jun 21 '12 at 17:12
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In any case, relying on some "near the end" opportunity to break a cycle would be unwise and failure prone I think. The best thing is to NOT create the cycle to begin with! –  NicolasMiari Jun 21 '12 at 17:36

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