Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have created this C# extension method for a Person class:

public static class PersonExtensions {
    public static void Rename(this Person person, String newName) {
        person.Name = newName;
    }
}

How would I unit test this method? I have tried it, but the Rename method is not available from the PersonAccessor object.

Error was "the private-accessor for Rename was not found"

When I try PersonExtensions_Accessor.Rename(somePerson, newName), it says "there are some invalid arguments"

share|improve this question
1  
Is the extension method stored in a namespace you aren't referencing? –  Austin Salonen Jun 21 '12 at 15:38
1  
Is the PersonAccessor class in a different namespace? If so, you'll need to using the namespace that contains PersonExtensions –  ean5533 Jun 21 '12 at 15:39
1  
As with any extension method, you can access the method like any static method because that's what it really is. You should be able to do something like PersonExtensions.Rename(myPersonInstance, myNewName). –  Jeff Mercado Jun 21 '12 at 15:39
    
What is the compiler error that you see when you try to spell out person.Rename(""); –  GregC Jun 21 '12 at 15:40
2  
PersonExtensions.Rename( pers, "some" ); –  Orn Kristjansson Jun 21 '12 at 15:41

3 Answers 3

Extension methods are just syntactic sugar for a different way to reference the static method. Just call PersonExtensions.Rename(...) in your unit test.

share|improve this answer
    
The method extends Person, not PersonExtensions. –  ean5533 Jun 21 '12 at 15:40
    
It would defeat the purpose of creating an extension method if you don't use the class that is being extended. The test would be more accurate if it called new Person(...).Rename(newName) –  ean5533 Jun 21 '12 at 15:43
    
It says: "the private-accessor for Rename was not found". What does that mean? When I try PersonExtensions_Accessor.Rename(somePerson, newName), it says "there are some invalid arguments". –  ryyst Jun 21 '12 at 15:47
1  
What is PersonExtensions_Accessor? Is it supposed to have the static methods in PersonExtensions? –  Tim S. Jun 21 '12 at 15:53
    
@ean5533: You can call it either personObject.Rename("new name"); or PersonExtensions.Rename(personObject, "new name");. Both are valid. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jun 21 '12 at 16:00

Here's my production code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ClassLibrary1
{
   public class Person
   {
      public string Name { get; set; }
   }

   public static class PersonExtensions
   {
      public static void Rename(this Person person, String newName)
      {
         person.Name = newName;
      }
   }
}

Here's the edited version of generated test:

using ClassLibrary1;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using System;

namespace TestProject1
{


    /// <summary>
    ///This is a test class for PersonExtensionsTest and is intended
    ///to contain all PersonExtensionsTest Unit Tests
    ///</summary>
   [TestClass()]
   public class PersonExtensionsTest
   {


      private TestContext testContextInstance;

      /// <summary>
      ///Gets or sets the test context which provides
      ///information about and functionality for the current test run.
      ///</summary>
      public TestContext TestContext
      {
         get
         {
            return testContextInstance;
         }
         set
         {
            testContextInstance = value;
         }
      }

      #region Additional test attributes
  // 
  //You can use the following additional attributes as you write your tests:
  //
  //Use ClassInitialize to run code before running the first test in the class
  //[ClassInitialize()]
  //public static void MyClassInitialize(TestContext testContext)
  //{
  //}
  //
  //Use ClassCleanup to run code after all tests in a class have run
  //[ClassCleanup()]
  //public static void MyClassCleanup()
  //{
  //}
  //
  //Use TestInitialize to run code before running each test
  //[TestInitialize()]
  //public void MyTestInitialize()
  //{
  //}
  //
  //Use TestCleanup to run code after each test has run
  //[TestCleanup()]
  //public void MyTestCleanup()
  //{
  //}
  //
  #endregion


      /// <summary>
      ///A test for Rename
      ///</summary>
      [TestMethod()]
      public void RenameTest()
      {
         Person person = new Person(); // TODO: Initialize to an appropriate value
         string newName = string.Empty; // TODO: Initialize to an appropriate value
         PersonExtensions.Rename(person, newName); // this could also be written as person.Rename(newName);
         Assert.AreEqual(person.Name, string.Empty);
      }
   }
}

The test passes.

share|improve this answer
    
I cannot create a Person, only a PersonAccessor. Likewise, I cannot access PersonExtensions directly, instead I have to use PersonExtensions_Accessor. –  ryyst Jun 21 '12 at 16:06
    
@ryyst I've used the generate test feature of Visual Studio 2010, and it produced a test that throws a null-ref. I edited my answer to include a passing test. –  GregC Jun 21 '12 at 16:35
    
@ryyst what are the differences between declarations of Person and PersonAccessor in your code? What are the namespaces and what are the access specifiers? (try to use reflector or object browser for this) –  GregC Jun 21 '12 at 16:49

I think that a good approach could be testing directly the extension method in an instance of Person.

Taking into account the method you have implemented, a sample code would be something like this:

using System;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using PersonExtension; // Don't forget about reference it

namespace UnitTest {
    [TestClass]
    public class UnitTest {
        Person person;
        [TestInitialize]
        public void Init() {
            person = new Person("Person name");
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void TestRename() {
            Assert.AreEqual("Person name", person.Name);
            person.Rename("New name");
            Assert.AreEqual("New name", person.Name);
        }
    }
}

Remember to reference both Person and PersonExtension classes and to have the correct hidden levels in the utility class in order to can access its methods

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.