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Using SimpleDateFormat.parse(String) requires that all fields specified in the format be present in the input string. What I would like is some way of validating partial input strings against the same format.

For example, Format="yyyy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss" and Input="2012/01/01" should match, and the time of day should be set to zero.

Is there any way of doing this? Currently, SimpleDateFormat throws an exception.

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SimpleDateFormat isn't a final class, you could extend it (or possibly DateFormat). I'm fairly sure there's no built-in way to get it to behave in that fashion; you're going to have write the differences yourself. Although, what happens if somebody only supplies '01' - do they mean January, the first of the (assumed current) month, 1:00:00, or something else? The formatters are basically providing instructions on how to interpret the string... –  Clockwork-Muse Jun 21 '12 at 15:43
    
The other alternative would be to start with the fullformat and then, using substring(), you remove the last character and create a new format until you find a format that matches. Kind of brutal, but very effective. –  Guillaume Polet Jun 21 '12 at 16:24

3 Answers 3

Here is a way to implement the solution proposed by m0skit0, using multiple SimpleDateFormat you can cascade the parsing with try catch, for eg.:

SimpleDateFormat fullFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss");
SimpleDateFormat shortFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy/MM/dd");

String input="2012/01/01";
Date res;
try {
    res = fullFormat.parse(input);
} catch (ParseException e) {
    res = shortFormat.parse(input);
}
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1  
Copy paste issue with your shortFormat =) –  Windle Jun 21 '12 at 16:01
    
I already provided this answer 15+ minutes ago. Please read existing answers before answering. –  m0skit0 Jun 21 '12 at 16:05
    
Thx to @Windle, I corrected. ;) –  Nicocube Jun 22 '12 at 8:36
    
@m0skit0, I read your answer but I though that illustrating with a sample code could help. Sorry for the double posting. May I edit your answer to add my example in it then delete my post ? ;) –  Nicocube Jun 22 '12 at 8:37
    
I don't think that a code example is necessary since it looks like he's already familiar with SimpleDateFormat and exception catching. But if you want, feel free to do so (don't forget to add yourself on the credits!) –  m0skit0 Jun 22 '12 at 9:00

Use 2 different SimpleDateFormat objects, each one with a different date format, and use the first. If a parsing exception is thrown, use the other one.

Best solution IMHO is that you check the string first using regular expressions so you know which parsing format to use. Also probably you want to use grouping in the regular expression and form the date yourself (e.g. using Calendar) instead of parsing the string at least twice (one by regex, second by DateFormat).

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1  
I like the regex idea much better. Thought of the exception thing too, but was trying to think of a clean solution that didn't rely on exceptions. –  Windle Jun 21 '12 at 15:48

Try the DateUtils#parseDate(String, String[]) from Apache Utils. It will allow you to pass an array of allowed formats and will try each one until something fits.

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