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The first one is enum class

enum coffeeSize{
    BIG(8), HUGE(10), OVERWHELMING(16);
    private int ounces;
    coffeeSize(int ounces ){
        this.ounces = ounces;
    }
    public int getOunces(){
        return ounces;
    }

}

This is class CoffeeTest1 and main

 public class CoffeeTest1 {
      coffeeSize size;

      public static void main (String args[]) {
          CoffeeTest1 drink1 = new CoffeeTest1();
          drink1.size = coffeeSize.BIG;

          System.out.println(" " + drink1.size.getOunces());
      }
}

The below is output

8  

My question : I don't understand the how drink1.size.getounces() manage to output 8. I haven't given constructor coffeeSize(8) object (ex: coffeeSize somex = new coffeeSize(BIG)). I want to know this simple subtle logic behind. Can someone help me understand please?

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Enum are classes with singleton instances of the inner objects. Based in that info, if you don't provide a constructor, the compiler provides the default (and in case of Enums, private) constructor, the enums can have attributes and methods also. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jun 21 '12 at 16:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I dont understand the how "drink1.size.getounces() " manage to output 8.

[...]

I want to know this simple subtle logic behind.

To understand the logic behind this, you can think of your enum as a regular class (which is actually how it is compiled), and

BIG(8)

as an instance of this class similar to

new coffeesize(8);

It should now be clear why drink1.size.getOunces() prints 8: BIG is just an instance of the coffeesize enum, for which you set ounces to 8 when constructing it.

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Thank you @ajoobe. this solved my doubt. –  MKod Jun 23 '12 at 4:37

One suggestion: find, learn, and follow the Sun Java coding standards. It'll improve your code's readability.

It outputs 8 because that's the size, in ounces, for BIG coffee size, according to your enum. That's the value that you passed into the BIG constructor.

drink1 is the instance of the class, which has a package visible data member of type coffeeSize named size. Every coffeeSize instance has a method getOunces that returns the integer value that you passed into its constructor.

There's nothing subtle about it.

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To clarify, when you create an enum, the enum calls it's constructor if available, and you see that it sets the ounces to 8. –  jsn Jun 21 '12 at 16:19
    
Not an enum; this enum that you provided. In most cases there's no need for all that extra machinery. –  duffymo Jun 23 '12 at 0:12

You will notice the getOunces method is defined on the enum. Enum values can themselves have properties and methods, in Java.

It is implied that CoffeeTest1 has a field that references the enum value.

So drink1 is an instance of that class..
the size property is set to the BIG instance of the enum..
Big has ounces 8.

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thank you. i got it now. –  MKod Jun 23 '12 at 4:38

When you specifies BIG(8) you are creating it passing 8 to its constructor (10 or 16). When you use it coffeeSize.BIG.getOunces() you are invoking its method getOunces. BIG, HUGE and OVERWHELMING are the possible values for a coffeeSize, each one with its own state.

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thank you for the help . i got it now. –  MKod Jun 23 '12 at 4:38

You can't instantiate enums using new keyword like classes ,enums are similar to static classes

coffeeSize size=coffeeSize.Big;

enums are very close to constants

 final int Big=8;

your Big has been set statically set to 8, so unfortunately it will be 8

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