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I want to delete a number of jobs from a q. The command to delete the job is qdel JOBid.

Initially, I tried to use the subprocess module, but I got an error: #!/usr/bin/env python

 import sys, os, subprocess as sp

 lo = sys.argv[1]
 hi = sys.argv[2]

 lo = int(lo)
 hi = int(hi)


for i in range(lo,hi):
    print "i is %d"%i
    p=sp.Popen(['qdel %d'%i],stdout=sp.PIPE)
    #os.system('qdel %d'%i)

So this did not work. The error I got was

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "del.py", line 14, in <module>
p=sp.Popen(['qdel %d'%i],stdout=sp.PIPE)
File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/subprocess.py", line 639, in __init__
errread, errwrite)
File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/subprocess.py", line 1228, in _execute_child
raise child_exception
OSError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory

Then I commented out the subprocess line and used os and it worked immediately. I think I don't fully understand the subprocess module

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys, os, subprocess as sp

lo = sys.argv[1]
hi = sys.argv[2]

lo = int(lo)
hi = int(hi)


    for i in range(lo,hi):
         print "i is %d"%i
         #p=sp.Popen(['qdel %d'%i],stdout=sp.PIPE)
         os.system('qdel %d'%i)

The above code worked flawlessly. I just want to know why and what the advantages are of the subprocess module. Also, I am using a unix shell

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you read manual, you can see that your call to Popen is wrong: you should pass not a single command, but an array of arguments:

p=sp.Popen(['qdel', '%d'%i],stdout=sp.PIPE)

Alternatively, as sc0tt's answer points out, you can use shell=True, but this has some disadvantages in more complex cases: you would have to manually escape all the variable data in the command in case it contains, for example, filenames with spaces or anything much more potentially harmful (like ;)

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Wouldn't you still be required to use shell=True though? If you don't specify shell=True doesn't Popen expect the first item in the list of arguments to be the path of the program to execute? –  sc0tt Jun 21 '12 at 16:41
1  
@sc0tt From man-page for execvp: The functions execlp() and execvp() will duplicate the actions of the shell in searching for an executable file if the specified filename does not contain a slash (/) character. –  aland Jun 21 '12 at 16:46
    
@sc0tt I have tested his answer and it worked. –  ironcyclone Jun 21 '12 at 16:47

You want to use shell=True on your Popen call.

p=sp.Popen(['qdel %d'%i], shell=True, stdout=sp.PIPE)
share|improve this answer
    
So if shell was false, then where was it trying to execute the command? –  ironcyclone Jun 21 '12 at 16:30
    
@Chris2021 With shell=False, it just runs the process with os.execvp(). With shell=True, it invokes your default shell and makes it execute the supplied string. –  aland Jun 21 '12 at 16:41
    
@aland Thank you. –  ironcyclone Jun 21 '12 at 16:44

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