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This is my very first F# programme. I thought I would implement Conway's Game of Life as a first exercise.

Please help me understand why the following code has such terrible performance.

let GetNeighbours (p : int, w : int, h : int) : seq<int> =
    let (f1, f2, f3, f4) = (p > w, p % w <> 1, p % w <> 0, p < w * (h - 1))
    [
    (p - w - 1, f1 && f2);
    (p - w, f1);
    (p - w + 1, f1 && f3);
    (p - 1, f2);
    (p + 1, f3);
    (p + w - 1, f4 && f2);
    (p + w, f4);
    (p + w + 1, f4 && f3)
    ]
    |> List.filter (fun (s, t) -> t)
    |> List.map (fun (s, t) -> s)
    |> Seq.cast

let rec Evolve (B : seq<int>, S : seq<int>, CC : seq<int>, g : int) : unit =
    let w = 10
    let h = 10
    let OutputStr = (sprintf "Generation %d:  %A" g CC) // LINE_MARKER_1
    printfn "%s" OutputStr
    let CCN = CC |> Seq.map (fun s -> (s, GetNeighbours (s, w, h)))
    let Survivors =
        CCN
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> (s, t |> Seq.map (fun u -> (CC |> Seq.exists (fun v -> u = v)))))
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> (s, t |> Seq.filter (fun u -> u)))
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> (s, Seq.length t))
        |> Seq.filter (fun (s, t) -> (S |> Seq.exists (fun u -> t = u)))
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> s)
    let NewBorns =
        CCN
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> t)
        |> Seq.concat
        |> Seq.filter (fun s -> not (CC |> Seq.exists (fun t -> t = s)))
        |> Seq.groupBy (fun s -> s)
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> (s, Seq.length t))
        |> Seq.filter (fun (s, t) -> B |> Seq.exists (fun u -> u = t))
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> s)
    let NC = Seq.append Survivors NewBorns
    let SWt = new System.Threading.SpinWait ()
    SWt.SpinOnce ()
    if System.Console.KeyAvailable then
        match (System.Console.ReadKey ()).Key with
        | System.ConsoleKey.Q -> ()
        | _ -> Evolve (B, S, NC, (g + 1))
    else 
        Evolve (B, S, NC, (g + 1))

let B = [3]
let S = [2; 3]
let IC = [4; 13; 14]
let g = 0
Evolve (B, S, IC, g)

The first five iterations, i.e. generations 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, happen without a problem. Then, after a brief pause of about 100 milliseconds, generation 5 is completed. But after that, the programme hangs at the line marked "LINE_MARKER_1," as revealed by breakpoints Visual Studio. It never reaches the printfn line.

The strange thing is, already by generation 2, the CC sequence in the function Evolve has already stabilised to the sequence [4; 13; 14; 3] so I see no reason why generation 6 should fail to evolve.

I understand that it is generally considered opprobrious to paste large segments of code and ask for help in debugging, but I don't know how to reduce this to a minimum working example. Any pointers that would help me debug would be gratefully acknowledged.

Thanks in advance for your help.

EDIT

I really believe that anyone wishing to help me may pretty much ignore the GetNeighbours function. I included it only for the sake of completeness.

share|improve this question
3  
Don't use the Seq module? –  Ramon Snir Jun 21 '12 at 16:45
4  
@Shredderroy : Seq is for lazy evaluation, which you almost certainly do not want. –  ildjarn Jun 21 '12 at 16:49
3  
F# sequence doesn't give decent performance. Using Seq.length and Seq.append makes performance even worse. –  pad Jun 21 '12 at 16:50
2  
@RamonSnir Yes, List is one way to solve O(exp(N)). However I think the bigger problem is not understanding Seq. "Never use Seq" is not very educational as far as advice goes :) –  t0yv0 Jun 21 '12 at 19:02
2  
@Shredderroy: Arrays are going to perform better than Seqs and even lists for this kind of processing because of locality. –  Daniel Jun 21 '12 at 19:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

See comments and all, but this code runs like hell - with both List.* and some other smaller optimisations:

let GetNeighbours p w h =
    let (f1, f2, f3, f4) = p > w, p % w <> 1, p % w <> 0, p < w * (h - 1)
    [
        p - w - 1, f1 && f2
        p - w, f1
        p - w + 1, f1 && f3
        p - 1, f2
        p + 1, f3
        p + w - 1, f4 && f2
        p + w, f4
        p + w + 1, f4 && f3
    ]
    |> List.choose (fun (s, t) -> if t then Some s else None)

let rec Evolve B S CC g =
    let w = 10
    let h = 10
    let OutputStr = sprintf "Generation %d:  %A" g CC // LINE_MARKER_1
    printfn "%s" OutputStr
    let CCN = CC |> List.map (fun s -> s, GetNeighbours s w h)
    let Survivors =
        CCN
        |> List.choose (fun (s, t) ->
            let t =
                t
                |> List.filter (fun u -> CC |> List.exists ((=) u))
                |> List.length
            if S |> List.exists ((=) t) then
                Some s
            else None)
    let NewBorns =
        CCN
        |> List.collect snd
        |> List.filter (not << fun s -> CC |> List.exists ((=) s))
        |> Seq.countBy id
        |> List.ofSeq
        |> List.choose (fun (s, t) ->
            if B |> List.exists ((=) t) then
                Some s
            else None)
    let NC = List.append Survivors NewBorns
    let SWt = new System.Threading.SpinWait()
    SWt.SpinOnce()
    if System.Console.KeyAvailable then
        match (System.Console.ReadKey()).Key with
        | System.ConsoleKey.Q -> ()
        | _ -> Evolve B S NC (g + 1)
    else 
        Evolve B S NC (g + 1)

let B = [3]
let S = [2; 3]
let IC = [4; 13; 14]
let g = 0
Evolve B S IC g
share|improve this answer
    
I would use Seq.countBy instead of Seq.groupBy here. –  pad Jun 21 '12 at 17:18
    
@pad indeed. Shall correct. –  Ramon Snir Jun 21 '12 at 17:19
1  
You can cut the run time in half by switching to arrays. –  Daniel Jun 21 '12 at 18:58
    
@Daniel arrays indeed seem to be faster. –  Ramon Snir Jun 21 '12 at 19:49

The simplest way to fix your performance is by using Seq.cache:

let GetNeighbours (p : int, w : int, h : int) : seq<int> =
    let (f1, f2, f3, f4) = (p > w, p % w <> 1, p % w <> 0, p < w * (h - 1))
    [
    (p - w - 1, f1 && f2);
    (p - w, f1);
    (p - w + 1, f1 && f3);
    (p - 1, f2);
    (p + 1, f3);
    (p + w - 1, f4 && f2);
    (p + w, f4);
    (p + w + 1, f4 && f3)
    ]
    |> List.filter (fun (s, t) -> t)
    |> List.map (fun (s, t) -> s)
    :> seq<_> // <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< MINOR EDIT, avoid boxing

let rec Evolve (B : seq<int>, S : seq<int>, CC : seq<int>, g : int) : unit =
    let w = 10
    let h = 10
    let OutputStr = (sprintf "Generation %d:  %A" g CC) // LINE_MARKER_1
    printfn "%s" OutputStr
    let CCN =
        CC
        |> Seq.map (fun s -> (s, GetNeighbours (s, w, h)))
        |> Seq.cache // <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< EDIT
    let Survivors =
        CCN
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> (s, t |> Seq.map (fun u -> (CC |> Seq.exists (fun v -> u = v)))))
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> (s, t |> Seq.filter (fun u -> u)))
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> (s, Seq.length t))
        |> Seq.filter (fun (s, t) -> (S |> Seq.exists (fun u -> t = u)))
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> s)
    let NewBorns =
        CCN
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> t)
        |> Seq.concat
        |> Seq.filter (fun s -> not (CC |> Seq.exists (fun t -> t = s)))
        |> Seq.groupBy (fun s -> s)
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> (s, Seq.length t))
        |> Seq.filter (fun (s, t) -> B |> Seq.exists (fun u -> u = t))
        |> Seq.map (fun (s, t) -> s)
    let NC =
        Seq.append Survivors NewBorns
        |> Seq.cache // <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< EDIT
    let SWt = new System.Threading.SpinWait ()
    SWt.SpinOnce ()
    if System.Console.KeyAvailable then
        match (System.Console.ReadKey ()).Key with
        | System.ConsoleKey.Q -> ()
        | _ -> Evolve (B, S, NC, (g + 1))
    else
        Evolve (B, S, NC, (g + 1))

let B = [3]
let S = [2; 3]
let IC = [4; 13; 14]
let g = 0
Evolve (B, S, IC, g)

The big problem is not using Seq per se, the problem is using it correctly. By default sequences are not lazy, instead they define computations that are re-evaluated on every traversal. This means that unless you do something about it (such as Seq.cache), re-evaluating the sequence may screw up the algorithmic complexity of your program.

Your original program has exponential complexity. To see that, note that it doubles the number of traversed elements with each iteration.

Also note that with your style of programming using Seq operators followed by Seq.cache has a small advantage over using List or Array operators: this avoids allocating intermediate data structures, which reduces GC pressure and may speed things up a bit.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! With these two small edits, I get 10,000 evolutions in 11428 milliseconds. This is slightly faster than the the version with lists, which requires 12719 milliseconds for 10,000 evolutions. Now I am going to try David's suggestion and use arrays. –  Shredderroy Jun 21 '12 at 19:31
    
I think it's really not about speed, it's about complexity. Your original code has poor algorithmic complexity. All suggested solutions have the same complexity - timing differences do not matter for your use case (and most use cases). –  t0yv0 Jun 22 '12 at 1:30

Just thought I would add a simple answer, in case other beginners like me run into the same problem.

As advised by Ramon Snir, ildjarn and pad above, I changed the Seq.X calls to List.X. I had to add a simple extra casting step to account for the fact that List does not have groupBy, but having done that, the code now runs like a charm!

Thanks a lot.

share|improve this answer

One of the most amazing characteristics of the ML family of languages is that short code is often fast code and this applies to F# too.

Compare your implementation with the much faster one I blogged here:

let count (a: _ [,]) x y =
  let m, n = a.GetLength 0, a.GetLength 1
  let mutable c = 0
  for x=x-1 to x+1 do
    for y=y-1 to y+1 do
      if x>=0 && x<m && y>=0 && y<n && a.[x, y] then
        c <- c + 1
  if a.[x, y] then c-1 else c

let rule (a: _ [,]) x y =
  match a.[x, y], count a x y with
  | true, (2 | 3) | false, 3 -> true
  | _ -> false
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for sharing! Yes, this is shorter and faster. The only defence I can present is that my implementation separates the "board" from the evolution. In my source code (not shown here) I have the following "boards": "hard square" (square with truncation at the edges), cylinder, genus-1 torus, RP2. I want to write a few other boards too, with interesting low dimension topology. I'm always trying to see how to improve my code. –  Shredderroy Feb 1 '13 at 3:27
    
@Shredderroy I see. I was quite perplexed when I first saw your code but if it is designed to be generic over topologies then that makes sense. I did something similar during my PhD to study the effects of network topology on the simulation of amorphous materials. –  Jon Harrop Feb 1 '13 at 20:32

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