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Can I inherit a structure in C? If yes, how?

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4  
There is no such thing as inheritance in C –  Ed S. Jul 11 '09 at 18:30
5  
...Unless you implement it. –  Philip Mar 20 '13 at 15:28

10 Answers 10

The closest you can get is the fairly common idiom:

typedef struct
{
    // base members

} Base;

typedef struct
{
    Base base;

    // derived members

} Derived;

As Derived starts with a copy of Base, you can do this:

Base *b = (Base *)d;

Where d is an instance of Derived. So they are kind of polymorphic. But having virtual methods is another challenge - to do that, you'd need to have the equivalent of a vtable pointer in Base, containing function pointers to functions that accept Base as their first argument (which you could name this).

By which point, you may as well use C++!

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Well, that's assuming a C++ compiler is available for your platform! –  anon Jul 13 '09 at 1:22
4  
If a C compiler is available, then so is a C++ compiler - just use one that produces C as its output. –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 13 '09 at 6:29
    
Phew.. you saved my life. I usually code in Java and when faced with the code similar to what you posted I thought it's a composition and was confused like hell when they cast it. –  Surya Wijaya Madjid Sep 11 '12 at 11:57
1  
You san see uses of that in complex real projects (like git). See log-tree.c. struct tag "inherits" from struct object –  albfan Apr 6 '13 at 23:36

C has no explicit concept of inheritance, unlike C++. However, you can reuse a structure in another structure:

typedef struct {
    char name[NAMESIZE];
    char sex;
} Person;

typedef struct {
    Person person;
    char job[JOBSIZE];
} Employee;

typedef struct {
    Person person;
    char booktitle[TITLESIZE];
} LiteraryCharacter;
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1  
As far as I know, you can have a struct/class member inside another in C++ as well. –  Tyler Millican Jul 11 '09 at 18:36
4  
Of course you can. –  anon Jul 11 '09 at 18:37
20  
C says that no padding appears before the first member of a struct. So you can in fact (and are allowed) cast LiteraryCharacter* to Person*, and treat it as a person. +1 –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 12 '09 at 1:06
4  
@JohannesSchaub-litb your comment was a better explanation than the answer itself :) –  PartiallyFinite Feb 15 '12 at 11:49
    
It is important to note that you must only pass these types be reference. You can't copy them into a Person object or it will splice. –  Kevin Cox Mar 16 at 17:35

I like and used the idea of Typesafe inheritance in C.

For example:

struct Animal
{
    int weight;
};

struct Felidae
{
    union {
      struct Animal animal;
    } base;
    int furLength;
};

struct Leopard
{
    union {
      struct Animal animal;
      struct Felidae felidae;
    } base;

    int dotCounter;
};

Usage:

struct Leopard leopard;
leopard.base.animal.weight = 44;
leopard.base.felidae.furLength = 2;
leopard.dotCounter = 99;
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I never thought of this. And if you make the union anonymous it is quite tidy. However the downside is that you need to list all parents in order to avoid nested variables. –  Kevin Cox Mar 16 at 17:34

If your compiler supports anonymous structs, you can do this:

typedef struct Base
{
    // base members
} Base_t;

typedef struct
{
   struct Base;  //anonymous struct

   // derived members

} Derived_t;

This way, base stuct members can be acessed directly, which is nicer.

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1  
The suffix _t is reserved in POSIX. Do whatever you want, just be advised that you're likely to run into conflicts if writing your code for a POSIX system (e.g. Linux) or someone eventually wants to port your code to a POSIX system. –  L0j1k Feb 1 at 8:09
    
This doesn't actually work in standard C (not even C11). –  Chase Mar 10 at 23:57

You can do the above mentioned

typedef struct
{
    // base members

} Base;

typedef struct
{
    Base base;

    // derived members

} Derived;

But if you want to avoid pointer casting, you can using pointers to a union of Base and Derived.

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If you want to use some gcc magic (that I would assume would work with Microsoft's C compiler) you can do something like:


struct A
{
   int member1;
};

struct B
{
   struct A;
   int member2;
}

With gcc you can compile this with -fms-extensions (Allows for unnamed struct members like Microsofts compiler does). This is similar to the solution given by Daniel Earwicker except that it allows you to access memeber1 on a struct B instance. i.e B.member1 instead of B.A.member1.

This is probably not the most portable approach and will not work if using a C++ compiler (different language semantics mean that it is redeclaring/defining struct A instead of instantiating it).

If however you live in the gcc/C land only it will work and do exactly what you want.

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Isn't this composition? –  Sumit Gera Sep 20 '13 at 20:08
    
Nope, it is proper inheritance. Assuming you have a struct of type struct B named b, b.member1 will compile and work as you would expect. Composition would be something like b.base.member1. GCC performs this magic for you. It actually has the definition of struct B as two integers in this case. –  Matt Sep 21 '13 at 1:11
    
Is this possible only in C, not in C++? If no, then please visit This. –  Sumit Gera Sep 21 '13 at 8:53
    
It is only C. The syntax is illegal in C++. Although C++ has proper inheritance of structs just like classes. –  Matt Sep 21 '13 at 12:55
    
Now I am feeling much better! –  Sumit Gera Sep 21 '13 at 15:44

C is not an object-oriented language and hence has no inheritance.

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You can simulate it, but you can't really inherit.

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2  
what's reality? C++ is just a very simple runtime library for dispatching and a lot of compiler syntax to call it when needed. the original C++ compilers produced C code, after all. (and very readable C in fact) –  Javier Jul 11 '09 at 19:51
3  
Meanwhile, other users have shown HOW to do this. –  luiscubal Jul 11 '09 at 20:28

No, you cant. imo the best approach to OOP in C is using ADT.

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No you cannot. C does not support the concept of inheritance.

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4  
doesn't support but doesn't get in the way either. –  Javier Jul 11 '09 at 19:50

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