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Say I have a button that is styled with the following CSS:

background-image: linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(112,166,30) 41%, rgb(150,222,42) 71%);
background-image: -o-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(112,166,30) 41%, rgb(150,222,42) 71%);
background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(112,166,30) 41%, rgb(150,222,42) 71%);
background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(112,166,30) 41%, rgb(150,222,42) 71%);
background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(112,166,30) 41%, rgb(150,222,42) 71%);
background-image: -webkit-gradient(
 linear,
 left bottom,
 left top,
 color-stop(0.41, rgb(112,166,30)),
 color-stop(0.71, rgb(150,222,42))
);

What is an easy way to keep having the same colors but show them brighter? Basically is to change the style when hovering the input element.

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2  
Use a :hover psuedo class? –  TheZ Jun 21 '12 at 17:28
    
That wouldn't show the colors brighter... I am asking for the simplest, cleanest way of maintaining the similar CSS but with brighter display of the colors. –  Hommer Smith Jun 21 '12 at 17:29
    
There is no "automatic" way of doing this, unless you want to use a CSS preprocessor. –  thirtydot Jun 21 '12 at 18:09

3 Answers 3

You cloud have a white background element (wrap your current code in a div or something) behind your gradient element, then change the opacity of your colors on hover. Otherwise, you will need a different color entirely.

Hope that helps. :)

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Use two classes:

.button {
... your existing css
}

Then use a separate set of colours for :hover

.button:hover {
... your existing css with different colours
}

You actually to set different colour values using CSS.

Here's a handy tool: http://www.colorzilla.com/gradient-editor/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I was basically trying to know what would be an easy way to say: Same colors but brighter. I assume I need to choose the colors, and there is not an easy way to say "brighter 10%" –  Hommer Smith Jun 21 '12 at 17:32
    
The same colour but "brighter" is actually a different colour code. –  Diodeus Jun 21 '12 at 17:33

Using CSS3 you can now use a more interesting color model : HSL in which the L is the light. That's a good model when you want to make the brightness of your color vary. If you want to make if more bright (not more pale as by using a white layer over it) this is the way to go.

If you don't want to change your css, you'll have to code. You can for example read and parse the css color (using jquery css function) and set it dynamically to a different value of the light component when hovering the object.

But the best solution if you have many colors and gradient would probably be to use a dynamic stylesheet like less in which you could simply define 2 (or more) values of the brightness to include in your css rules.

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