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Every so often I see "Speed Up Your PC" programs that offer a RAM cleaning feature.

They claim to defrag and free up unused memory like a garbage collector or something... not sure.

Here are some examples:

http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/Memory-Tweak/Clean-Ram.shtml

http://download.cnet.com/Instant-Memory-Cleaner/3000-2086_4-10571833.html

http://www.uniblue.com/software/speedupmypc/

I'm interested in learning about the Win32 C API's that they are using, if anyone has knowledge.

I've heard about the ProcessIdleTasks() in advapi32.dll trick, but doesn't look too legit looking at the documentation on that function.

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Allocate a big chunk of memory, almost as big as RAM, commit (touch) it, free it. Enjoy you empty memory and how all other programs struggle to get their memory back from the swap. –  Hristo Iliev Jun 21 '12 at 17:35
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For reference, a discussion on the utility of such things on SuperUser: superuser.com/questions/214526/… –  Michael Kohne Jun 21 '12 at 17:43
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I seriously doubt such programs accomplish anything useful at all. The only use I can imagine for them would be as a band-aid for badly written programs. –  Carey Gregory Jun 21 '12 at 20:46
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All these apps do is muck with Windows' memory management which actually does a very good job on its own. –  Andrew Lambert Jun 21 '12 at 22:03
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Most of them are probably scams. –  Linuxios Jun 23 '12 at 0:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you really insist on doing this, you could enumerate processes, open a handle to each, and call SetProcessWorkingSetSize(process_handle, -1, -1); for each (but you really don't want to do this).

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gave it to you since it gave a win32 api to do what was asked (even though no1 shud) –  y2k Jun 22 '12 at 23:31

I don't know how those particular programs work, but in the past I saw the source to a similar program.

It basically allocated a ton of RAM in one shot and then released it.

System RAM was "freed" because other programs had to swap to the disk.

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Really dirty solution. :) –  Naszta Jun 21 '12 at 20:04
    
@Naszta: And yet, probably the only one. I have had to deal with constant swapping, and it is NOT fun. That's when I quadrupled my RAM. –  Linuxios Jun 23 '12 at 0:31

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