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Why this returns false instead of true.

function doit(expression) {

    var regex = new RegExp(expression, 'g');

    alert(regex.test('mename@memail.com'));
}

doit("/^\w+([-+.\']\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*/");
​

http://jsfiddle.net/hAV8Q/

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It doesn't work because new RegExp doesn't expect strings bookended with slashes; the first and last characters are part of the literal regex pattern. –  apsillers Jun 21 '12 at 17:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Either format your expression properly:

function doit(expression) {
    var regex = new RegExp(expression, 'g');
    alert(regex.test('mename@memail.com'));
}

doit("^\\w+([-+.\\']\\w+)*@\\w+([-.]\\w+)*\\.\\w+([-.]\\w+)*");
// no / here, escape \

or pass the expression directly:

function doit(expression) {
    alert(expression.test('mename@memail.com'));
}

doit(/^\w+([-+.\']\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*/g);


The slashes (/) are not part of the expression, they denote a regex literal. If you use a string containing the expression, you have to omit them and escape every backslash since the backslash is the escape character in strings as well.

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2  
Because backslash is an escape character in strings, you need to escape all the backslashes, e.g., \\w instead of \w. You'd have much cleaner code if you just supplied an actual RegExp object instead of a string, as in the second option in this answer. –  apsillers Jun 21 '12 at 17:45
    
@RegisteredUser: When you have backslashes in a string you have to escape them: jsfiddle.net/Guffa/hAV8Q/4 –  Guffa Jun 21 '12 at 17:46
    
Right, I forgot about escaping the backslash... that's why I avoid using regex as strings ;) –  Felix Kling Jun 21 '12 at 17:46

Because when creating a regex with new RegExp(), you don't use the delimiters. Remove the / from before and after the string.

Alternatively, pass the regex itself by removing the quotes before and after, and leave out the new RegExp() call.

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