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I'm trying to write a stored procedure that checks for a certain value and either returns an error or continues with an update statement. I have tried writing the proc and everything seems to be syntactically sound, however it only seems to check for the certain value and when that is not found it just seems to skip over the update that needs to occur. My current code is below:

declare @newID varchar = 099393
declare @oldID varchar = 260260
Declare @pMsg   varchar(255) 

if exists (select * from req where dept_id=@oldID)
begin
    SET @pMsg = 'The department ID ' + @oldID + ' cannot be changed at this time.'
    return
end 

Begin Try
    Begin TRAN   
        update dbo.dept
        set dept_id = @newID
    where dept_id = @oldID
COMMIT TRAN
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
  ROLLBACK TRAN
    update dbo.dept
    set dept_id = @oldID
    where dept_id = @oldID
END CATCH

select dept_id=@newID
return 

share|improve this question
    
All stored procedures are inherently in transactions. There is no need for implementing a rollback in your code, as far as I can tell. –  Matthew Jun 21 '12 at 17:50
    
Hmm true.. I tried running it without the transaction bit and just with the update statement after the conditional and it still seems to skip the update and output (0 rows affected) –  RobGries Jun 21 '12 at 17:52
    
Can you please be more description in what the intended behavior is? –  Matthew Jun 21 '12 at 17:53
    
I need to write a stored proc that will check if the oldID matches a dept_id in the req table and return an error. If the oldID doesn't match a dept_id in the req table it should proceed to update the dept_id in the dept table so that a department stored as a row in this table now reflects the changed dept_id. –  RobGries Jun 21 '12 at 17:57
    
So you want it to update the ID to the new value if it exists, and throw an error if it does not exist? –  Matthew Jun 21 '12 at 18:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well your whole Try-Catch block is pointless, and would be functionally equal to the following

declare @newID varchar = 099393 
declare @oldID varchar = 260260 
declare @pMsg  varchar(255)  

if exists (select * from req where dept_id=@oldID) 
begin 
    set @pMsg = 'The department ID ' + @oldID + ' cannot be changed at this time.' 
    return 
end

update dbo.dept 
set dept_id = @newID 
where dept_id = @oldID

Note; I've removed the trailing dept id select and return keyword. You already know the new id so why bother selecting it out. I've left the @pMsg assignment in because I assume this is an output parameter.

So the only reason for the dept update not to work (when old id didn't exist in the req table) would be if the old id did not exist in the dept table.

Wow how stupid of me not to spot this you haven't set the lengths of your varchars, so both newid and oldie have a length of 1 and therefore won't take the assigned values 099393 and 260260

At the least they should be

declare @newID varchar(6) = 099393 
declare @oldID varchar(6) = 260260
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This seemed to work after I fixed my datatypes... D'oh! it was expecting char instead of varchar. –  RobGries Jun 21 '12 at 19:39
    
good you noticed that too :) –  Chris Moutray Jun 21 '12 at 19:41
    
In this case, yes Try catch is pointless as there is only one transaction. However, if you are doing more than one insert/Update/delete, you should be using them. –  HLGEM Jun 21 '12 at 21:10
    
Never had a need, since my c# apps manage the transactions –  Chris Moutray Jun 21 '12 at 21:37

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