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Considering the use of delegates in C#, does anyone know if there is a performance advantage or if it is a convenience to the programmer? If we are creating an object that holds a method, it sounds as if that object would be a constant in memory to be called on, instead of loading the method every time it is called. For example, if we look at the following Unity3D-based code:

public delegate H MixedTypeDelegate<G, H>(G g)

public class MainParent : MonoBehaviour // Most Unity classes inherit from M.B.
{
    public static Vector3 getPosition(GameObject g)
    {
        /* GameObject is a Unity class, and Vector3 is a struct from M.B.
        The "position" component of a GameObject is a Vector3. This method
        takes the GameObject I pass to it & returns its position. */

        return g.transform.position;
    }

    public static MixedTypeDelegate<GameObject, Vector3> PositionOf;

    void Awake( ) // Awake is the first method called in Unity, always.
    {
        PositionOf = MixedTypeDelegate<GameObject, Vector3>(getPosition);
    }
}

public class GameScript : MainParent
{
    GameObject g = new GameObject( );
    Vector3 whereAmI;

    void Update( )
    {
        // Now I can say:
        whereAmI = PositionOf(g);

        // Instead of:
        whereAmI = getPosition(g);
    }
}

. . . But that seems like an extra step - unless there's that extra little thing that it helps.

I suppose the most succinct way to ask a second question would be to say: When you had your aha moment in understanding delegates, what was the context/scenario/source?

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closed as not constructive by dtb, Hristo Iliev, arcain, Brian Rasmussen, Luksprog Jun 22 '12 at 16:18

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They kind of just "made sense" to me. Then again, I learned about them when I was learning about the Observer Pattern which heavily relied on it. –  Mike Bantegui Jun 21 '12 at 19:11
    
I think of delegates like an Interface for a function... –  Wayne Werner Jun 21 '12 at 21:23

2 Answers 2

My Aha moment of the purpose of delegates was events. The ability to add delegates to an event with each one pointing to a function that will handle it in its own way made sense to me.

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This is exactly the sort of answer that I bet will help me and a bunch of others figure this out. You experienced coders keep this up: everyone thinks differently and there might be someone out there who will figure it out best the way you did. Thank you, Justin! I'm off to read about events. –  CM90 Jun 21 '12 at 19:02

The purpose of a delegate is to provide a runtime branching point in your code.

class Foo
{
    public void Method1()
    {
    }

    public SomeDelegateType Method2;
}

Method1 is a fixed code point, calling it will always result in the same code being exectued (the body of Method1). Method2 is a delegate. You can think of a delegate as a "pointer to zero or more methods". Each method assigned to the delegate is called in the order it was added. The result of calling it can change at runtime as methods can be added/removed at will.

Another way to think of a delegate is as a "variable method". You use variables to hold values which can be changed. You use a delegate to hold method "address(es)" which can be changed. I use the term 'address' here loosely to keep the answer simple.

added

In response to your comment, if I understand correctly you want to know how to specify the delegate type.

A delegate type has to be defined, just as any other type does:

// define a delegate type that returns 'float' and accepts zero parameters
delegate float AMethodThatReturnsSingle();

// here is a method that accepts one of those as a parameter
float Method(AMethodThatReturnsSingle d)
{
    // call the passed in delegate and return its value
    return d();
}

The .Net Framework provides a number of delegate types that are useful for common situations. Here's a substitute for the custom delegate we declared above that uses the generic Func<> delegate type:

float Method(Func<float> d)
{
    // call the passed in delegate and return its value
    return d();
}

Func comes in several flavors to support parameters:

// Encapsulates a method that has no parameters and returns a value of the type
//     specified by the TResult parameter.
delegate TResult Func<TResult>();
// Encapsulates a method that has one parameter and returns a value of the type
//     specified by the TResult parameter.
delegate TResult Func<T, TResult>(T arg);
// Encapsulates a method that has two parameters and returns a value of the type
//     specified by the TResult parameter.
delegate TResult Func<T1, T2, TResult>(T1 arg1, T2 arg2);

There is also Action<> which returns nothing and takes zero or more parameters of the types you specify (up to four are defined I believe).

There is Predicate<> which returns bool and takes one or more parameters of the type you specify.

And there is the ubiquitous EventHandler<T> which is the recommended type to use for events.

Just to name a few.

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A further question I did not include in this post is: If I made a delegate an argument, then how do I get the value as the return type I want it? 'public float aMethod(Delegate d){/*Get d as type float (the delegate & method's return type), not type Delegate*/}' Sounds like you might know this answer. I was thrown straight into C# and had to teach myself pointers from the original C. I understand variable pointers, but I'm going back to read up on function pointers. Thanks again. –  CM90 Jun 21 '12 at 19:54
    
@CM90 I responded by editing my answer –  Tergiver Jun 21 '12 at 21:05

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