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I have two numpy arrays that define the x and y axes of a grid. For example:

x = numpy.array([1,2,3])
y = numpy.array([4,5])

I'd like to generate the Cartesian product of these arrays to generate:

array([[1,4],[2,4],[3,4],[1,5],[2,5],[3,5]])

In a way that's not terribly inefficient since I need to do this many times in a loop. I'm assuming that converting them to a Python list and using itertools.product and back to a numpy array is not the most efficient form.

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I noticed that the most expensive step in itertools approach is the final conversion from list to array. Without this last step it's twice as fast as Ken's example. –  Alexey Lebedev Jun 21 '12 at 19:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted
>>> numpy.transpose([numpy.tile(x, len(y)), numpy.repeat(y, len(x))])
array([[1, 4],
       [2, 4],
       [3, 4],
       [1, 5],
       [2, 5],
       [3, 5]])

See Using numpy to build an array of all combinations of two arrays for a general solution for computing the Cartesian product of N arrays.

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Another approach that tests a bit faster for me is to use meshgrid + dstack:

>>> numpy.dstack(numpy.meshgrid(x, y)).reshape(-1, 2)
array([[1, 4],
       [2, 4],
       [3, 4],
       [1, 5],
       [2, 5],
       [3, 5]])

I did a few tests; see the end of this post for a very simple, general solution that performs very well, if not always optimally, for all inputs. Definitions:

>>> def repeat_product(x, y):
...     return numpy.transpose([numpy.tile(x, len(y)), 
                                  numpy.repeat(y, len(x))])
...
>>> def dstack_product(x, y):
...     numpy.dstack(numpy.meshgrid(x, y)).reshape(-1, 2)
...     
>>> x, y = numpy.array([1, 2, 3]), numpy.array([4, 5])

dstack_product is a tad faster for small arrays:

>>> %timeit repeat_product(x, y)
10000 loops, best of 3: 38.1 us per loop
>>> %timeit dstack_product(x, y)
10000 loops, best of 3: 29.2 us per loop

And a bit faster yet for large arrays:

>>> x, y = numpy.arange(500), numpy.arange(500)
>>> %timeit repeat_product(x, y)
10 loops, best of 3: 62 ms per loop
>>> %timeit dstack_product(x, y)
100 loops, best of 3: 12.2 ms per loop

For smaller arrays it's also faster than cartesian:

>>> x, y = numpy.arange(100), numpy.arange(100)
>>> %timeit cartesian([x, y])
1000 loops, best of 3: 911 us per loop
>>> %timeit dstack_product(x, y)
1000 loops, best of 3: 233 us per loop

But very large arrays, it doesn't do quite as well:

>>> x, y = numpy.arange(1000), numpy.arange(1000)
>>> %timeit cartesian([x, y])
10 loops, best of 3: 25.4 ms per loop
>>> %timeit dstack_product(x, y)
10 loops, best of 3: 66.6 ms per loop

Then there's a generalized version that should work on arbitrary-dimensional products. This is as fast or faster than cartesian for all inputs that I tried:

def cartesian_product(arrays):
    broadcastable = numpy.ix_(*arrays)
    broadcasted = numpy.broadcast_arrays(*broadcastable)
    rows, cols = reduce(numpy.multiply, broadcasted[0].shape), len(broadcasted)
    out = numpy.empty(rows * cols, dtype=broadcasted[0].dtype)
    start, end = 0, rows
    for a in broadcasted:
        out[start:end] = a.reshape(-1)
        start, end = end, end + rows
    return out.reshape(cols, rows).T

It beats both cartesian and dstack for very large products:

>>> x, y = numpy.arange(1000), numpy.arange(1000)
>>> %timeit cartesian_product([x, y])
100 loops, best of 3: 11.2 ms per loop

Finally, here's a vastly simplified approach that performs similarly to the above -- sometimes a bit faster, sometimes a bit slower, but never different by more than 50%. (This is based on ideas from mgilson):

def cartesian_product2(arrays):
    la = len(arrays)
    arr = np.empty([len(a) for a in arrays] + [la])
    for i, a in enumerate(np.ix_(*arrays)):
        arr[...,i] = a
    return arr.reshape(-1, la)
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@AndyHayden, I thought I had tested that code but I guess I edited it after the fact. Thanks! –  senderle Jul 2 '13 at 13:01
    
A postscript -- the last method is interesting because it uses ix_ in a non-standard way. Usually one uses ix_ to generate indices into an array; but it just so happens that the shape required for those indices is the same shape that allows for broadcasted assignment. I can't tell whether this is an "abuse" of ix_ or an exploitation of a deeper principle. –  senderle Jun 9 at 15:35

You can just do normal list comprehension in python

x = numpy.array([1,2,3])
y = numpy.array([4,5])
[[x0, y0] for x0 in x for y0 in y]

which should give you

[[1, 4], [1, 5], [2, 4], [2, 5], [3, 4], [3, 5]]
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You can also use the numpy.outer. In your case you simply need to use:

numpy.outer(x,y)

I hope numpy would have optimised the function.

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2  
That function is hopefully optimized, but it does not compute the desired output (i.e. elements are multiplied, not paired). –  hans_meine Jun 2 at 8:48

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