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I have a singleton and want to create internal flag variable that should indicate that singleton was "released" and when I getting singleton instance its should reinitialize itself.

For this case I decide to use static variable

static BOOL wasReleased = NO; 

and set it to "YES" in destroy function:

- (void)destroy
{
    wasReleased = YES;
    ...release internal singleton resources...
}

But when I try to get singleton instance this variable value is always "NO" so internal resources never reinitialized after releasing:

+ (MySingleton *)sharedInstance
{
    if (sharedCoordinator == nil)
    {
        sharedCoordinator = [[super alloc] init];
        [sharedCoordinator initialize];
    }

    if (wasReleased) 
    {
        [sharedCoordinator initialize];
    }

    return sharedCoordinator;
}

My understanding of this situation maybe wrong, please clarify its for me.

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You mean it's NO after you send destroy? –  Josh Caswell Jun 21 '12 at 18:51
    
Do you call destroy manually? because I guess otherwise the object will just never be destroyed –  Joerg Simon Jun 21 '12 at 19:09
    
Josh Caswell, yes, its value is NO after sending destroy. I'm changing value of "wasReleased" only in this two situations in question above. I check wasReleased value inside destroy, so it is YES how I'm expected, but after it is not. Joerg Simon, yes, I'm calling "destroy" manually, I'm using breakpoints to make sure. –  zakhej Jun 22 '12 at 4:53
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closed as too localized by Josh Caswell, Bill the Lizard Jun 27 '12 at 12:46

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This does not address your immediate concern, but you should reconsider your design. Destroying a singleton is not a good idea. If you are trying to free up significant resources (images, videos, etc.) you can make the actual methods on the singleton responsible for re-instantiating them.

The following will not work as expected:

- (id)initSomeClassUsingTheSingleton
{
  mySingletonVariable = [MySingleton sharedInstance];
}

- (void)someOtherFunctionOccuringAfterDestroy
{
  [mySingletonVariable aMethodOnTheSingleton];
}

This is a perfectly valid way to use a singleton, yet in your case you cannot do it. Instead your singleton should have methods like the following:

- (void)aMethodOnTheSingleton
{
  //if resources for method not allocated
    // .. allocate

  // do the rest
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Hi, David V, thanks for answer. Of course I'm not want to release singleton instance, only resources incapsulated in singleton. Only one problem is that I can't understand reason why my bool flag not keeping its value. As I understand it, your resourcesForMethodNotAllocated has the same meaning as my wasReleased. –  zakhej Jun 22 '12 at 5:00
    
I edited the post to clarify that if(resourcesForMethodNotAllocated) was only conceptual. It may be the same as the wasReleased boolean, though I would suggest making it an instance variable. It may also be different if different methods need different resources. I don't know which your problem calls for. –  David V Jun 22 '12 at 14:25
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My understanding of this situation maybe wrong, please clarify its for me.

Why are you using a singleton in the first place? A singleton should never need to be released or re-initialized. If you need to do those things, it's very likely that you should simply create a new instance of your class whenever you need one.

Also, it would be a good idea to avoid using -initialize as an instance method name as that could easily be confused with the class method +initialize that every class has.

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Remove your static wasReleased instance variable and make it a property of MySingleton class (don't forget to synthesize it)

@property (nonatomic, assign) BOOL wasReleased;

then in the -destroy method:

- (void)destroy
{
    self.wasReleased = YES;
    //...release internal singleton resources...
}

then (remove your static ivar sharedCoordinator - I suppose you have one)

+ (MySingleton *)sharedInstance
{
    static MySingleton *sharedCoordinator = nil;
    if (!sharedCoordinator)
    {
        sharedCoordinator = [[MySingleton alloc] init];
        [sharedCoordinator initialize];
    }

    if (sharedCoordinator.wasReleased) 
    {
        [sharedCoordinator initialize];
        sharedCoordinator.wasReleased = NO; //If you are not doing it in the -initialize method
    }

    return sharedCoordinator;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain why you think this will help? –  Josh Caswell Jun 21 '12 at 19:20
    
Because, declaring a static instance variable (for both cases with wasReleased and sharedCoordinator) and using it in a class method doesn't make sense, because in the class method you are not in the scope of the instance. The class method cannot access instance variables, but you can access them from an instance... –  graver Jun 21 '12 at 20:01
    
It's not an instance variable -- it couldn't be declared like that if it was -- and there's no such thing as a "static instance variable". It's a static file-level variable (which is accessible in a class method); this is the workaround in ObjC for "class member variables". –  Josh Caswell Jun 21 '12 at 20:03
    
Yes there isn't - you're right.. I didn't provide a good explanation... –  graver Jun 21 '12 at 20:06
1  
Hmm you're right, just tested his solution and it works as expected, he is probably not calling the destroy method :) –  graver Jun 21 '12 at 20:35
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