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I have a UITableView in a ViewController with a custom UITableClass implemented. The table displays different songs that the user can play. The table is populated by a method that pulls data from a server. This method is called in ViewDidLoad.

The user can also tag songs as a 'favorite'. I'd like the user to be able to view all of their 'favorite' tracks in a new `UITableView'. This table should be exactly the same, only with a different data source (only favorited tracks from the server).

How should I implement this? Should I create another method that loads new data to the table with only 'favorited' tracks? Should initialize a new UITableView with the same class and somehow set a different data source or a new ViewController? If so, how?

There will be a slight difference between the two ViewControllers that contain the UITableViews. The original ViewController with all of the tracks will have a button that either changes the datasource or initializes a new UITableView (depending on how it's implemented). The 'favorited' ViewController will have a back button.

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6 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can always go the route of just updating a central playlist UITableView, in which case you would just swap the data in your dataSource (in this case, perhaps NSMutableArray *playlist?) and then call [UITableView reloadData]. In this scheme, you avoid the overhead of having multiple views and the trouble of passing data around.

If you're planning to create additional functionality for your favorited song list, a secondary, customized UIViewController might be in order. In this sense, it can be re-used if you decide to have additional song lists. This would be a good solution if you intend to let them do anything additional that you wouldn't want cluttering your main interface with your list(s) such as editing title, song order, etc.

If these two views would be more or less identical, you can just set up a new UIViewController, either pass the new data via property or load it in your init, and then push it onto the view stack. So long as your app is navigation-based, the back button will appear on its own once you push your secondary UIViewController onto the stack. That isn't functionality you need to add on your own. The perks of this include code-reusability, which is a good skill to have as a UI designer and an engineer.

If you just want a read-only view, you can also look into a UIPopoverController with the data that would dismiss once they click away. This solution is not robust in the least and shouldn't be used if you intend the user to be doing anything more than tapping an entry, or if you expect your datasets to get big.

When planning your UI and flow, just make sure you think of what directions you might take it in the future. As mentioned in another answer, how you store your data makes a difference, as well as how you intend to make calls to your server (button clicks? after a set time?)

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I would create a segmented control that has options for "Favorites | All" and when it is switched a BOOL called favoritesOnly or something like that is switched from YES to NO or vice versa. My songs would be kept in an NSArray of NSDictionarys called songsArray and I would use this as my DataSource methods:

-(NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section
{
    if(favoritesOnly)
    {
        NSInteger count = 0;
        for(int n=0; n<[songsArray count]; n++)
            if([[[songsArray objectAtIndex:n] objectForKey:@"Favorite"] isEqualToString:@"YES"])
                count++;
        return count;
    } 
    else 
    {
        return [songsArray count];
    }
}

and then for the cells:

-(UITableViewCell *) tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath;
{
    UITableViewCell *theCell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"Proto Cell"];
    if(favoritesOnly)
    {
        NSInteger count = -1;
        for(int n=0; n<[songsArray count]; n++)
        {
            if([[[songsArray objectAtIndex:n] objectForKey:@"Favorite"] isEqualToString:@"YES"])
            {
                count++;
                if(count==[indexPath row])
                {
                     //Configure the Cell using [songsArray objectAtIndex:n]
                     return theCell;
                }
            }
        }
        //If you got here there was an error;  Error cell?
        return theCell;
    }
    else
    {
        //Configure cell using [songsArray objectAtIndex:[indexPath row]]
        return theCell;
    }
}  

This way you are using the same set of Data and the same UITableView, you are just using your control to properly delegate how the DataSource displays the information on the UITableView

Now, if you are using CoreData and and NSFetchedResultsController, this is all much much easier.

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how do you store your data from the server? if you use CoreData (or MagicalRecord, which I can recommend) that having a fetched results controller with a different argument would be the only change you need.....

Ah, link to MagicalRecord: MagicalRecord

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when you are tagging song as a favorite send one flag as a favorite to the web-service and then call another web service in the favorite view controller and make new table view with the same custom class and view the new source coming from server... and if you are storing in sq-lite or using core data make one column extra as favorite and call it in favorite view controller and load it with different data-source.

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I would have a refresh method, and a button that switches between "show all" and "show favorites".

Basically, if the button is clicked, switch to the opposite group of objects, and update the text on the button accordingly. The table will always load an array called "tableDataArray" in my example, and you'll get row counts and such from the length of it.

Like...

-(IBAction)refresh {

if ([faveButton.text isEqualToString:@"Show All"]){

     tableDataArray = favoriteArray; 
     [faveButton setText:@"Show Favorites"];
    }
else {
    tableDataArray = allSongsArray;
    [faveButton setText:@"Show All"];
    }

 [tableView reloadData];

}
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1  
NEVER use labels on UI controls to control execution flow. And don't compare strings with ==. –  Stanislav Yaglo Jun 21 '12 at 19:43
    
I could suggest he keep a bool instead, but there's nothing wrong with this approach. The data is there already, so take advantage of it! I did, however, remove the == and replace it with isEqualToString: –  Nick Esposito Jun 21 '12 at 19:52
    
This is just plain bad. Now imagine that you need to localize your app (support several languages). What will you (or the person after you) do? How much time will you spend on it? How many bugs will you catch or (worse) miss? –  Stanislav Yaglo Jun 21 '12 at 20:04
    
Then of course the check could be a BOOL and you would set kFavoriteString and kAllSongsString. If OP is the type of dev who uses localization, he would know to avoid this anyway. –  Nick Esposito Jun 21 '12 at 20:19
    
And if he isn't you just teach him the wrong ways of developing software from the beginning. Awkay :) –  Stanislav Yaglo Jun 21 '12 at 20:25
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Simplest way to do it would be to have two instances of the same view controller. Each instance will have its own data source, one with all the songs, another with only the favorites.

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