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Sample Data:

603       Some garbage data not related to me, 55, 113 ->

1-ENST0000        This is sample data blh blah blah blahhhh
2-ENSBTAP0        This is also some other sample data
21-ENADT)$        DO NOT WANT TO READ THIS LINE. 
3-ENSGALP0        This is third sample data
node #4           This is 4th sample data
node #5           This is 5th sample data

This is also part of the input file but i dont wish to read this. 
Branch -> 05 13, 
      44, 1,1,4,1

17, 1150

637                   YYYYYY: 2 : %

EDIT: In the above data. The column width is fixed for the sections but there might be some sections I do not wish to read. above sample data has been edited to reflect that.

So in this input file I want to read contents of first section '1-ENST0000' into an array and contents of '2-ENSBTAP0' into a separate array and so on.

I am having trouble coming up with a regex that will define the pattern ...first three lines have <someNumber>-ENS<someotherstuf> and then there can also be node #<some number here>

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Does the fourth and fifth lines really contain 'node #4' and 'node #5'? I.e. do some of the first columns really contain spaces? –  Sinan Ünür Jul 11 '09 at 20:11
    
I just dont want to also read the heading as well. I changed that regex so it reads these heading but did not know how to read content after the match if found and leave the match out. –  Aaron Jul 11 '09 at 20:13
    
yeah. fourth and fifth lines do have the heading of node #4 and node #5. After the heading there are spaces, Yes. So contents for all heading start at the same location and are aligned.... –  Aaron Jul 11 '09 at 20:15
    
Well, you showed us input, and described something about it but i still don't get what you need to get out of the data. Maybe show us some expected output? –  user80168 Jul 11 '09 at 23:05
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK, based on your later comment, this is a little different than the previous question. Also, I now realize that node #54 is a valid entry in the first column.

Update: I now also realize you do not need the first column.

Update: In general, you neither want to nor need to deal with character arrays in Perl.

Update: Now that you clarified the what should and should not be skipped, here is a version that deals with that. Add patterns to taste in the if condition.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @data;

while ( <DATA> ) {
    chomp;

    if ( /^[0-9]+-ENS.{5} +(.+)$/
            or /^node #[0-9]+ +(.+)$/
    ) {
        push @data, [ split //, $1 ];
    }
}

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper \@data;

__DATA__
603       Some garbage data not related to me, 55, 113 ->

1-ENST0000        This is sample data blh blah blah blahhhh
2-ENSBTAP0        This is also some other sample data
21-ENADT)$        DO NOT WANT TO READ THIS LINE. 
3-ENSGALP0        This is third sample data
node #4           This is 4th sample data
node #5           This is 5th sample data

This is also part of the input file but i dont wish to read this. 
Branch -> 05 13, 
      44, 1,1,4,1

17, 1150

637                   YYYYYY: 2 : %

As for learning how to fish, I recommend you read everything related in perldoc perltoc.

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Also in this if I again want each character to be store din different elemtnt of array I should change @row = split ' ', $_, 2; to @row = split \\, $_, 2; ? –  Aaron Jul 11 '09 at 20:25
    
no no !...data does begin at a fixed column but there are other sections in the file with the same column width which i do not wish to read. So I'll take the regex from your previous edited version. –  Aaron Jul 11 '09 at 20:29
    
Here is your comment from above: "yeah. fourth and fifth lines do have the heading of node #4 and node #5. After the heading there are spaces, Yes. So contents for all heading start at the same location and are aligned.... – Aaron 15 mins ago" –  Sinan Ünür Jul 11 '09 at 20:30
    
:( I'm sorry.... –  Aaron Jul 11 '09 at 20:32
    
I've updated the question to bring more clarity –  Aaron Jul 11 '09 at 20:34
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Good question! Looks very similar to this one (linking so original answer can get more votes):

Reading sections from a file in Perl

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They look similar because they were asked by the same person, who presumably hasn't bothered to learn anything –  friedo Jul 11 '09 at 22:47
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Is this really a fixed-column file? If so, then don't bother with regexps. Just split at the column width, perhaps trimming trailing white space from columen 1.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for pointing that out ... although it is hard to be sure that is the case based on the wording of the question. –  Sinan Ünür Jul 11 '09 at 20:24
    
Edited the question to reflect this. –  Aaron Jul 11 '09 at 20:35
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