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I'm creating directories through a python module. Some kinds of directories require certain restrictive access permissions to be set. The module will be used through scripts; and the scripts can be run either by users or by a server (as root).

I want to avoid the situation where I create a directory, try to change its permissions and catch an OSError exception because I don't have sufficient privileges. Instead of trying to clean up a mess after it occurs, it will be much more robust for my application to prevent the problem in the first place. My hope is that there is some way of determining whether the user running the script has group privileges before actually trying to use them.

For a "normal" user, I can do something like this:

import os
import grp
mygroups = [grp.getgrgid(x).gr_name for x in os.getgroups()]

Then, if mygroups does not contain the groups I need it to contain, I can gracefully exit.

But this doesn't work for the root user, who does have permissions but is probably not a member of the groups in question. I'm not clear whether there are any exceptions other than root, so I hesitate to simply write an exception that covers only the root user id.

Is there a robust way in python 2.x to check whether the current user has certain group permissions (to change access permissions and ownership of directories) without actually attempting to use those permissions (throwing an OSError)?

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3  
There is nothing wrong with catching an exception. Ask for forgiveness, not permission is the Pythonic way to deal with things, and it means you avoid a race condition. –  Lattyware Jun 21 '12 at 19:45
    
@Lattyware: The situation is a little more complex than you perceive. If the permissions can be validated early, having to clean up a huge mess after the fact can be avoided. –  Mayur Patel Jun 21 '12 at 19:50
    
@larsmans: os.mkdir(), os.chmod(), os.chown() –  Mayur Patel Jun 21 '12 at 19:51
    
@MayurPatel: never mind, I get what you're after. I was mistaken about chown semantics. –  larsmans Jun 21 '12 at 19:53
    
@MayurPatel And if you check, the permissions change, and then it caries on? You still need to handle that exception and clean up anyway. –  Lattyware Jun 21 '12 at 19:56

1 Answer 1

Is there a robust way in python 2.x to check whether the current user has certain group permissions (to change access permissions and ownership of directories) without actually attempting to use those permissions (throwing an OSError)?

Maybe; I don't know if POSIX allows the groups of a process to be changed from the outside as it runs. If it doesn't, there may be a way to do that. If it does, there's a race condition.

In any case, it's not the preferred way of doing this in either Python or POSIX. Here's the robust way of doing what you want:

def mkdir_for_gid(path, gid, mode):
    # make a dir that no-one may touch.
    os.mkdir(path, 0700)
    try:
        os.chown(path, os.getuid(), gid)
        os.chmod(path, mode)
        return path
    except:
        # Some operation failed. We don't care which one, we just clean up.
        # We do know that it wasn't mkdir, so the error from that is not masked
        # by any error from rmdir.
        os.rmdir(path)
        raise

Note that I'm using a "bare" except clause, which the Python style guide PEP-8 disallows. Since we re-raise the exception, there's no problem with that here.

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I thought about that. I was hoping to avoid actually creating a temp directory unnecessarily - seemed messy. I thought for sure there would be some simple means of determining a user's permissions! –  Mayur Patel Jun 21 '12 at 20:49
    
@MayurPatel: that's not how Python and POSIX are designed (except for the access system call), because it would leave all kind of security holes wide open. "Just try" is the best advice. –  larsmans Jun 22 '12 at 9:41

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