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I don't do much with Javascript.

What I'm looking to do is have a form where users can enter their zip code to see if they are within a select number of zip codes (the client's service area).

If their zip code is in the list, I want to send them to a URL for scheduling an appointment. If it isn't in the list, I want some sort of alert that says "Sorry, your zip code isn't in our service area".

I've got something adapted that kind of works, but sends the user to the page regardless of what they enter.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

<form name = "myform" action="http://www.google.com/">
Enter Your Zip Code <input type = "text" name = "zip" size = "5" maxlength = "5" onchange = "checkZip()">
<button id="submit">Submit</button>
</form>

<script type = "text/javascript">
    function checkZip() {

        var z = document.myform.zip;
        var zv = z.value;
        if (!/^\d{5}$/.test(zv)) {
            alert("Please enter a valid Zip Code");
            document.myform.zip.value = "";
            myfield = z; // note myfield must be a global variable
            setTimeout('myfield.focus(); myfield.select();', 10); // to fix bug in
                                                                  // Firefox
            return false;
        }

        var codes = [ 12345, 12346, 12347, 12348, 12349, 12350 ]; // add as many
                                                                  // zip codes as
                                                                  // you like,
                                                                  // separated by
                                                                  // commas (no
                                                                  // comma at the
                                                                  // end)
        var found = false;
        for ( var i = 0; i < codes.length; i++) {
            if (zv == codes[i]) {
                found = true;
                break;
            }
        }

        if (!found) {
            alert("Sorry, the Zip Code " + zv + " is not covered by our business");
            document.myform.zip.value = "";
            return false;
        } else {
            alert("Press okay to go forward to schedule an appointment");
        }
    }
</script>
share|improve this question
    
What's the problem? Your code works for me. Enter 12345 and I get the "Press okay...." alert. Enter 98765 and I get the "sorry, the zip code..." alert. – AaronS Jun 21 '12 at 19:52

Non-submit Button (simple) Solution

<form name = "myform" action="http://www.google.com/">
    Enter Your Zip Code <input type = "text" name = "zip" size = "5" maxlength = "5">
    <button type="button" onclick="checkZip();" id="submit">Submit</button>
</form>

Note: a button with type="button" is a push button and does not submit w3c

And change the last block of checkZip() to:

if (!found) {
    alert("Sorry, the Zip Code " + zv + " is not covered by our business");
    document.myform.zip.value = "";
    //do nothing
} else {
    alert("Press okay to go forward to schedule an appointment");
    document.myform.submit();
}

The changes I made were the following:

  • Move the onclick attribute from the input element to the submit button
  • Change the submit button to have a type of 'button', which makes it a push button. Push buttons do not automatically submit the the current form.

Note: This will not stop the situation where pressing enter inside the input element submits the form. You will need an onSubmit="" handler according to the next solution to handle that use case.

Submit button (simple) solution

<form name = "myform" action="http://www.google.com/" onsubmit="checkZip()">
    Enter Your Zip Code <input type = "text" name = "zip" size = "5" maxlength = "5">
    <button onclick="checkZip();" id="submit">Submit</button>
</form>

Note: a button with no type is a submit button by default w3c

And change the last block of checkZip() to:

if (!found) {
    alert("Sorry, the Zip Code " + zv + " is not covered by our business");
    return false;
} else {
    alert("Press okay to go forward to schedule an appointment");
    return true;
}

The changes I made were the following:

  • Move the checkZip() call to the onsubmit attribute on the form
  • Change checkZip() to return true/false

On Change Solution

This solution most closely replicates yours. However it adds more complexity:

The Form:

<form name = "myform" action="http://www.google.com/" onsubmit="onFormSubmit();">
    Enter Your Zip Code
    <input type = "text" id="zipCode" name = "zip" size = "5" maxlength = "5" onchange = "onZipChange()">
    <button id="submit">Submit</button>
    <div id="invalidZipMsg" style="display:none;">
            Sorry, but we do not service your area.
    </div>
</form>

The JavaScript:

/**
 * Returns true if we receive a valid zip code.
 * False otherwise.
 * 
 * @param zipCode The zip code to check
 * @returns True/fase if valid/invalid
 */
function isValidZip(zipCode){
    var validZipCodes = {'12345':true, 
                         '12346':true, 
                         '12347':true, 
                         '12348':true, 
                         '12349':true, 
                         '12350':true
                        };

    //can do other checks here if you wish
    if(zipCode in validZipCodes){
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    };
}

/**
 * Run on invalid zip code.
 * Disables form submission button and shows
 * error message.
 */
function invalidZipCode(){
    var invalidZipMsg = document.getElementById('invalidZipMsg');
    invalidZipMsg.style.display = "block";

    var submitButton = document.getElementById('submit');
    submitButton.disabled = 'true';
}

/**
 * Run on valid zip code. Enables form
 * submission button and hides the error message.
 * @returns
 */
function validZipCode(){
    var invalidZipMsg = document.getElementById('invalidZipMsg');
    invalidZipMsg.style.display = "none";

    var submitButton = document.getElementById('submit');
    submitButton.disabled = 'true';
}

/**
 * onChange handlers for the zip code input element.
 * Will validate the input value and then disable/enable
 * the submit button as well as show an error message.
 * @returns
 */
function onZipChange(){
    var zipCode = document.getElementById('zipCode');
    if(isValidZipCode(zipCode.value)){
        validZipCode();
    } else{
        invalidZipCode();
    };
}

/**
 * Run on form submission. Further behavior is the same
 * as @see onZipChange. Will stop form submission on invalid
 * zip code.
 */
function onFormSubmit(){
    var zipCode = document.getElementById('zipCode');

    if(isValidZipCode(zipCode.value)){
        validZipCode();
        return true;
    } else{
        invalidZipCode();
        return false;
    };
}

Notes

There are many ways to solve this problem. I just chose the two easiest ones and one that I feel offers a better user experience. The non-submit solution is a good example for when you have buttons that don't submit, but provide other actions that don't require a form submission. The last one has the best user experience in my opinion, but that is just an opinion.

Off Topic

If you have time I would suggest you check out many of the fine JavaScript libraries that are available. They help introduce complex/advanced issues with simple solutions that make sense and are more than likely cross-browser compliant. I suggest them in my order of my preference:

Be aware though, that they will take time to understand. I know that when working on a project that is not the top priority.

The fastest way to get started with jQuery and JavaScript in general is here: First Flight. I am not associated w/ codeschool.com in anyway nor do I get any profits from them. This example is free and it is the one that my team passes around at work for people just starting off with jQuery.

share|improve this answer
    
Andrew, thank you so much for your easy to understand and thorough answers. They were very helpful. I've decided to use your first solution. It seems to work the way I want it. I am using it on link but it doesn't seem to validate correctly. I've typed in some zip codes that aren't within the var codes and it's still pushing them through without bringing up the alert. But thanks so much. You've helped a ton. I do want to learn jQuery and JavaScript. I've started with some Lynda.com trainings so that should get me going. – dcaryll Jun 22 '12 at 12:02
    
Ahh, I see the issue. If I hit enter to submit, it automatically takes me through to the URL. If I hit the "submit" button, it will correctly validate. Although if it is a Zip code from the list and the alert pops up, it doesn't push it through to the URL. – dcaryll Jun 22 '12 at 12:44
    
onChange only fires after the element loses focus. If form submission happens before focus is lost then onChange will not fire. The solution to handling that situation is to also hand the onSubmit="" with a handler that validates the zipcode and returns true/false to allow/stop the submission. – Andrew Martinez Jun 22 '12 at 14:30
    
Alright. I've got it to a point where it correctly validates with an alert whether or not it is a Zip code from the list. If it's correct, it moves forward to the link after an alert. But if it's incorrect, it still proceeds with the link after the alert. I'm not sure how to make it stop if an invalid zip is entered after the alert. Thanks again for all of your help. – dcaryll Jun 22 '12 at 15:17

I'm assuming your problem is that the user can still submit the form even though the zipcode is invalid.

I'd recommend moving the check into the form submit event like this

<form name = "myform" action="http://www.google.com/" onsubmit = "checkZip()">
  Enter Your Zip Code <input type = "text" name = "zip" size = "5" maxlength = "5">
  <button id="submit">Submit</button> 
</form>

Then you can just return false when the check fails to cancel the submission to google.com

share|improve this answer

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