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I'm encountering an error sprintf statement. I added a printf command to help investigate, and it seems that maybe one of my doubles isn't being understood (printf outputs a string of nonsense numbers where a %3.1f should be.) However, the double is interpreted correctly the first time it is called in the printf statement. By increasing the size name from 120 to 320, the segfault does go away. But the double is still not interpreted correctly, i.e. it still outputs a string of nonsense numbers where a simple %3.1f should be. I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong. Any ideas? A minimal test case version of the code and the error message posted below.

    #include <iostream>
    #include <string>
    #include <fstream>
    #include <sstream>
    #include <strstream>
    #include <vector>

    using namespace std;


    void Back_Subt_beta()
    {

        int resonances = 4;
        char name[320];
        double rpos[66];
        double rbinmin[66];
        double rbinmax[66];

        ifstream binedgein;
        binedgein.open("binedges.dat");
        if (binedgein.is_open()) {
            cout << "data file opens" << endl;
            }
        for (int vline=1; vline<=4; vline++)
        {
            binedgein >> var1 >> var2 >> var3;
            rpos[vline-1] = var1;
            rbinmin[vline-1] = var2;
            rbinmax[vline-1] = var3;
        }
        binedgein.close();


        for (int m=2; m<=7; m++)
        {
            for (int j=0; j<resonances; j++)
            {
                printf("resonance%0#7.2feV/gammas_%3.1feV_Mcl%i", rpos[j],rpos[j],m);
                sprintf(name,"resonance%0#7.2feV/gammas_%3.1feV_Mcl%i",rpos[j],rpos[j],m);
            }
        }
        exit();
    }

and the file binedges.dat

16.2      16.0      16.5
38.75     38.25     39.25
44.5      43.5      45.5
55.25     54.75     55.75

And the error:

Processing Back_Subt_beta.C...
data file opens

 *** Break *** segmentation violation
resonance0016.20eV/gammas_917241681885348612676436160464141677586357964289319457240620564649334534999701390133785258335880600276911524435084428436805391368574132924760441246552362332456319675531264.0eV_Mcl16(no debugging symbols found)
Using host libthread_db library "/lib/tls/libthread_db.so.1".
Attaching to program: /proc/7689/exe, process 7689
[Thread debugging using libthread_db enabled]
[New Thread -1208284352 (LWP 7689)]
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(no debugging symbols found)...done.

0x006dd7a2 in _dl_sysinfo_int80 () from /lib/ld-linux.so.2
#1  0x014d3533 in __waitpid_nocancel () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#2  0x0147c869 in do_system () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#3  0x00962b8d in system () from /lib/tls/libpthread.so.0
#4  0x00bebc8e in TUnixSystem::Exec () from /usr/local/root/lib/libCore.so
#5  0x00be6dfb in TUnixSystem::StackTrace () from /usr/local/root/lib/libCore.so
#6  0x00be5c53 in TUnixSystem::DispatchSignals () from /usr/local/root/lib/libCore.so
#7  0x00bebf4d in SigHandler () from /usr/local/root/lib/libCore.so
#8  0x00be0590 in sighandler () from /usr/local/root/lib/libCore.so
#9  <signal handler called>
#10 0x014b1d0a in strcmp () from /lib/tls/libc.so.6
#11 0x003033be in G__searchvariable () from /usr/local/root/lib/libCint.so
#12 0x002f9514 in G__getvariable () from /usr/local/root/lib/libCint.so
#13 0x0021de97 in G__getitem () from /usr/local/root/lib/libCint.so
#14 0xbfeb89dc in ?? ()
#15 0x0021c633 in G__getexpr () from /usr/local/root/lib/libCint.so
#16 0x00000048 in ?? ()
#17 0x002e9bc8 in G__letvariable () from /usr/local/root/lib/libCint.so
#18 0xbfeb987c in ?? ()
Root > Function Back_Subt_beta() busy flag cleared
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2  
Are you sure that the problem isn't with access to an invalid array location? –  user195488 Jun 21 '12 at 19:58
    
I'm not sure exactly what you mean. But I used cout statements to determine that the segfault happens right at that sprintf line, not after it when I try to get the file named in the sprintf command. So I inserted the printf statement before to see what the sprintf was doing. –  neverskipbreakfast Jun 21 '12 at 20:12
    
possible duplicate of Sprintf Segmentation Fault –  user195488 Jun 21 '12 at 20:21
    
The string is supposed to be <40 characters long. I thought that was ok...however: increasing the size to name[320] does stop the segfault. But the double is still not interpreted correctly, i.e. it still outputs a string of nonsense numbers where a simple %3.1f should be. –  neverskipbreakfast Jun 21 '12 at 20:22
1  
You really should be using snprintf and that way it only copies what you need. It could be that the char array is filling up . –  user195488 Jun 21 '12 at 20:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think your problem is that the char array name is only 120 bytes, but you are overflowing that buffer with your sprintf statement. Increase the size of your char buffer from 120 bytes to a larger value. Better yet, use snprintf() instead of sprintf().

share|improve this answer
    
Increased it to 320, and the segfault stops, but the result of the sprintf is still jibberish. I've never used snprintf, but I'll look into it now... –  neverskipbreakfast Jun 21 '12 at 20:42
    
I would like to have used snprintf, but unfortunately I couldn't find the appropriate header files on my system (and I'm not an admin.) I was able to temporarily solve the issue by splitting the sprintf into two different ones and then combining them. It's ugly, but it was the only working solution immediately available to me. I'll see if I can find those header files for the future. –  neverskipbreakfast Jun 22 '12 at 16:51
    
@neverskipbreakfast: Did you try to #include <cstdio>. –  user195488 Jun 22 '12 at 18:57

I wondered what that number was, so I did this:

$ python
Python 2.7.2+ (default, Oct  4 2011, 20:06:09) 
[GCC 4.6.1] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> x = 917241681885348612676436160464141677586357964289319457240620564649334534999701390133785258335880600276911524435084428436805391368574132924760441246552362332456319675531264.0
>>> import struct
>>> struct.pack('<d', x)
'resonanc'

So the original error was definitely caused by your string overwriting the buffer. If you're getting a different garbage value, try looking at the actual bits, and maybe you'll figure it out.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting! So, even when I increase the length of the char string to name[500], I still get the same garbage value when I cout the name, but there is no segfault. Is that possible that 500 isn't enough? Am I not understanding the limitations of sprintf? Also maybe interestingly, the last variable I get in the string is not correct either. I'm supposed to get something like resonance0016.00eV/gammas_16.0eV_Mcl2, but instead I get resonance0016.00eV/gammas_(garbage)eV_Mcl16. –  neverskipbreakfast Jun 22 '12 at 0:39

you are overflowing the name char array which is 120 chars only. Better would be to use std::string namestr and then do str.c_str() while stuffing the name

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