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The following simple code pattern is very common in graphics programming.
It creates an array of layers and loops over them.

struct Layer
{
    int n;
    void operator()(float value)
    {
    }
};

struct AnotherLayer
{
    int n;
    int m;
    void operator()(float value)
    {
    }
};

void process_layers(Layer_t* layer, size_t size, float value) 
{
    for (size_t n = 0; n < size; ++n)
        layer[n](value);
}

Layer a = {1};
Layer b = {2};
AnotherLayer c = {2,3};
typedef std::function < void (float) > Layer_t;
Layer_t layers [] = {a,b,c};
process_layers(layers, sizeof(layers)/sizeof(Layer), 100);

I would like to convert this to use varadic templates in c++11. Any ideas how I could do this. This is what I would like it to look like. Any ideas? Is this even possible?

template <int n>
struct Layer
{
    void operator()(float value)
    {
    }
};

template <int n, int m>
struct AnotherLayer
{
    void operator()(float value)
    {
    }
};

template <typename Layer1, typename Layer2, ...>
struct Layers  //process_layers
{
    void operator()(float value)
    {
        for (size_t n = 0; n < SIZEOF(Layer1,Layer2,...); ++n)
            Layer[N]()(value);
    }
};

Then I could do this.

typedef Layers<Layer<1>, Layer<2>, AnotherLayer<3,8> > funky_layer_t;
typedef Layers<Layer<4>, Layer<5>, Layer<5>, AnotherLayer<6,7> > standard_layer_t;
typedef Layers<funky_layer_t, standard_layer_t> awesome_layer_t;

awesome_layer_t()(100);

Note: with the second approach, all paramaters to construct layers are known at compile time.

share|improve this question
    
That isn't a very constructive use of variadic templates. Templates are a compile time construct to handle various types. Just use a std::vector<Layer> to have a variable sized array that can shrink, grow, iterate, etc. –  AJG85 Jun 21 '12 at 20:09
    
Why template layer class is better for you? What is the effort of templates here? I have really bad experience on C++ codes, where templates where forced to use (The previous coder had a really good book on templates... :) ). –  Naszta Jun 21 '12 at 20:10
    
Then I could, at compile time, construct very complex combinations of layers. For example: typedef Layers<gray_layer_t,gaussian_filter_t,opaque50_t> clean_layer_t; –  Tom Brinkman Jun 21 '12 at 20:16
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The example you give is very simple to re-do with variadic templates.

template<typename Func> void process(Func &&f) {} // base case for zero items

// overload for at least one item
template<typename Func, typename FirstItem, typename... Items>
void process(Func &&f, FirstItem &&fi, Items &&...is) {
    std::forward<Func>(f)(std::forward<FirstItem>(fi));          // f(fi);
    process(std::forward<Func>(f), std::forward<Items>(is)...);  // process(f,is...);
}

Layer a = {1};
Layer b = {2};
Layer c = {3};

process([](Layer &l){ l(100); },
        a, b, c);

Also notice that this avoids all the unnecessary copies in the original. (Though of course you could also avoid them just by doing Layer layers[] = {{1},{2},{3}};)


I'm not exactly sure how your later comments and code are related to running an operation over a collection of layers.

What exactly is the computation you want to perform at compile-time?


To adjust for the new example the process() does not need to change at all, you only need to create a functor that can handle each type. (polymorphic lambdas would help here, but we'll have to make due with an explicit functor type)

Layer a = {1};
Layer b = {2};
AnotherLayer c = {2,3};

struct TheOperation {
    template<typename T>
    void operator() (T &t) {
        t(100);
    }
};

process(TheOperation(),
    a, b, c);

Here's your awesome_layer_t transcribed to correct variadic template syntax, but I still don't see what you want to accomplish, so I can't say if this is a good way to do it or not. This doesn't actually call the operator()s at compile-time, it only arranges to have a bunch of objects default constructed at runtime and then operator() called, again, at runtime.

template <int n>
struct Layer
{
    int operator()(float value)
    {
        std::printf("L %d %e\n",n,value);
        return 0;
    }
};

template <int n, int m>
struct AnotherLayer
{
    int operator()(float value)
    {
        std::printf("AL %d %d %e\n",n,m,value);
        return 0;
    }
};

template <typename... Ls>
struct Layers  //process_layers
{
    int operator()(float value)
    {
        struct Tmp {
            void operator() (...) {}
        };
        Tmp()( Ls()(value)...);
        return 0;
    }
};

typedef Layers<Layer<1>, Layer<2>, AnotherLayer<3,8> > funky_layer_t;
typedef Layers<Layer<4>, Layer<5>, Layer<5>, AnotherLayer<6,7> > standard_layer_t;
typedef Layers<funky_layer_t, standard_layer_t> awesome_layer_t;

int main() {
    awesome_layer_t()(100);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have not tried this, but the motivating reason for looking for new pattern is to construct complext combinations of layers at compile time. I dont see how your example moves us in that direction. Also, your process function is a tad hard to understand, with all those std::forward's. –  Tom Brinkman Jun 21 '12 at 20:36
    
>> What exactly is the computation you want to perform at compile-time? This is purely for synactic sugar. I want to pass an image buffer through each layer. –  Tom Brinkman Jun 21 '12 at 20:38
    
>> Layer layers[] = {{1},{2},{3}} This wont work, because it assumes each layer will have the same constructor. Each layer could be very different from each other. The only similar thing is the operator()(int) prototype. –  Tom Brinkman Jun 21 '12 at 20:42
    
In your example the type of Layer seems completely irrelevant. It could be some massively complex constructed type or an int, so long as whatever operation you're performing works on it. So what is stopping you from constructing whatever types you want and processing them this way? –  bames53 Jun 21 '12 at 20:44
    
Good point, I've revised my example. –  Tom Brinkman Jun 21 '12 at 20:45
show 7 more comments

I believe that you can do this using normal function templates as follows:

/* Base case: If you have no layers to apply, do nothing. */
void executeLayers() {
    // Deliberately empty.
}

/* Recursive step: If you have at least one layer, apply it, then apply the
 * remaining layers.
 */
template <typename Head, typename... Tail> 
void executeLayers(Head head, Tail... tail) {
    head();              // Execute the first layer
    executeLayers(tail); // Execute the remaining layers
}

You could then do something like this:

executeLayers(layer1, layer2, layer3, layer4, layer5);

Hope this helps!

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