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I was trying to answer another question about polymorphism vs sharing when I stumbled upon this strange behaviour.

In GHCi, when I explicitly define a polymorphic constant, it does not get any sharing, which is understandable:

> let fib :: Num a => [a]; fib = 1 : 1 : zipWith (+) fib (tail fib)
> fib !! 30
1346269
(5.63 secs, 604992600 bytes)

On the other hand, if I try to achieve the same by omitting the type signature and disabling the monomorphism restriction, my constant suddenly gets shared!

> :set -XNoMonomorphismRestriction
> let fib = 1 : 1 : zipWith (+) fib (tail fib)
> :t fib
fib :: Num a => [a]
> fib !! 50
20365011074
(0.00 secs, 2110136 bytes)

Why?!

Ugh... When compiled with optimisations, it is fast even with monomorphism restriction disabled.

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3  
An aside: Reasoning about performance in ghci is a little strange -- its a) about 30x slower than ghc itself, and b) any real world code will use optimizations, so lessons learned in ghci won't be that useful. –  Don Stewart Jun 21 '12 at 20:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

By giving explicit type signature, you prevent GHC from making certain assumptions about your code. I'll show an example (taken from this question):

foo (x:y:_) = x == y
foo [_]     = foo []
foo []      = False

According to GHCi, the type of this function is Eq a => [a] -> Bool, as you'd expect. However, if you declare foo with this signature, you'll get "ambiguous type variable" error.

The reason why this function works only without a type signature is because of how typechecking works in GHC. When you omit a type signature, foo is assumed to have monotype [a] -> Bool for some fixed type a. Once you finish typing the binding group, you generalize the types. That's where you get the forall a. ....

On the other hand, when you declare a polymorphic type signature, you explicitly state that foo is polymorphic (and thus the type of [] doesn't have to match the type of first argument) and boom, you get ambiguous type variable.

Now, knowing this, let's compare the core:

fib = 0:1:zipWith (+) fib (tail fib)
-----
fib :: forall a. Num a => [a]
[GblId, Arity=1]
fib =
  \ (@ a) ($dNum :: Num a) ->
    letrec {
      fib1 [Occ=LoopBreaker] :: [a]
      [LclId]
      fib1 =
        break<3>()
        : @ a
          (fromInteger @ a $dNum (__integer 0))
          (break<2>()
           : @ a
             (fromInteger @ a $dNum (__integer 1))
             (break<1>()
              zipWith
                @ a @ a @ a (+ @ a $dNum) fib1 (break<0>() tail @ a fib1))); } in
    fib1

And for the second one:

fib :: Num a => [a]
fib = 0:1:zipWith (+) fib (tail fib)
-----
Rec {
fib [Occ=LoopBreaker] :: forall a. Num a => [a]
[GblId, Arity=1]
fib =
  \ (@ a) ($dNum :: Num a) ->
    break<3>()
    : @ a
      (fromInteger @ a $dNum (__integer 0))
      (break<2>()
       : @ a
         (fromInteger @ a $dNum (__integer 1))
         (break<1>()
          zipWith
            @ a
            @ a
            @ a
            (+ @ a $dNum)
            (fib @ a $dNum)
            (break<0>() tail @ a (fib @ a $dNum))))
end Rec }

With explicit type signature, as with foo above, GHC has to treat fib as potentially polymorphically recursive value. We could pass some different Num dictionary to fib in zipWith (+) fib ... and at this point we would have to throw most of the list away, since different Num means different (+). Of course, once you compile with optimizations, GHC notices that Num dictionary never changes during "recursive calls" and optimizes it away.

In the core above, you can see that GHC indeed gives fib a Num dictionary (named $dNum) again and again.

Because fib without type signature was assumed to be monomorphic before the generalization of entire binding group was finished, the fib subparts were given exactly the same type as the whole fib. Thanks to this, fib looks like:

{-# LANGUAGE ScopedTypeVariables #-}
fib :: forall a. Num a => [a]
fib = fib'
  where
    fib' :: [a]
    fib' = 0:1:zipWith (+) fib' (tail fib')

And because the type stays fixed, you can use just the one dictionary given at start.

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1  
Aha! That explains a lot. Thank you! –  Rotsor Jun 22 '12 at 0:23

Here you are using fib with the same type argument in both cases, and ghc is smart enough to see this and perform the sharing.

Now, if you used the function where it can be called with different type arguments, and defaulting led to one of those being very different than the other, then the lack of monomorphism restriction would bite you.

Consider using the term x = 2 + 2 polymorphically in two contexts without the monomorphism restriction, where in one context you show (div x 2) and in another you use show (x / 2), In one setting you get the Integral and Show constraints which causes you to default to Integer, in the other you get a Fractional and a Show constraint and that defaults you to Double, so the result of the computation isn't shared, as you are working with a polymorphic term applied to two distinct types. With the monomorphism restriction turned on, it tries to default one time for something both Integral and Fractional and fails.

Mind you its tricker to get all this to fire these days with let not generalizing, etc.

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