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In a WinForms solution, you have multiple controls of the same type. You need to add an event handler to each of the control and at the current time the event handler will be doing the same thing. You do not expect there to be difference between them down the road any reason.

eg:

ScheduledPatientsGrid.ProcessGridKey += ScheduledPatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey;
RecentPatientsGrid.ProcessGridKey += RecentPatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey;
RecentPatientsGrid.ProcessGridKey += RecentPatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey;

... 

private void ScheduledPatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
   ...
}

private void RecentPatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
   ...
}

private void PatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
   ...
}

Now is it better to sharing an single Event Handler between the different events as shown below or use different ones like in the code sample shown above?

ScheduledPatientsGrid.ProcessGridKey += ProcessGridKey;
RecentPatientsGrid.ProcessGridKey += ProcessGridKey;
RecentPatientsGrid.ProcessGridKey += ProcessGridKey;                


private void ProcessGridKey(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
  ...
}

In the following page, Microsoft seems to suggest that sharing is better, however I notice that they have not updated it since .NET 2.0 (ie: Visual Studio 2008)

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/4ac48519%28v=vs.90%29.aspx

Is there a Guide that makes a best practices recommendation in this case?

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

I would absolutely use the same method. What possible benefit is there to having multiple methods which do exactly the same, none of which is named to say what it does?

Personally I abhor the source_EventName convention that Visual Studio spawns. I prefer to give my event handler methods meaningful names which say what they do. Then when you look down the event handler list in the designer, you can see that when a button is clicked, X will happen rather than "the button's click event handler will be called" which is useless.

Alternatively, use lambda expressions to subscribe to the events and call meaningful methods with meaningful parameters. (The sender and args are often useless for event handlers.)

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense. I never thought of the designer aspect (probably because I never use the designer >.>) – Chris Sinclair Jun 21 '12 at 20:25
    
@ChrisSinclair: If you never use the designer there's even less excuse to use those pitiful names ;) – Jon Skeet Jun 21 '12 at 20:26
    
Perhaps. I tend to end up reading the event wrappers then as "this is what happens when the user clicked on the button" (or whatever event), but on second thought, I guess the event listeners really shouldn't care about the context in which they're being called. If it changes from a mouse click to a key press, then does the rest of my code even care? Should it care? I suppose not. The only place it matters is where I register the event in the first place. Thanks, I'll strongly consider this the next time I wire events. :) – Chris Sinclair Jun 21 '12 at 20:30
4  
Thinking about it some more (yay comment spam), it even makes a lot of sense when registering the listener. MyButton.Click += MyButton_Click tells me absolutely nothing about what's going to happen. MyButton.Click += ValidateFormInput tells me that the button will perform validation when clicked; it's infinitely more useful and readable. :D – Chris Sinclair Jun 21 '12 at 20:35

In this case, I usually have them wrap a common method, but I keep their event handlers named per usage. This allows me to easily unit test the method and (usually) reduce the needed parameters, and any errors in the stack trace will be very readable as to which grid the process failed for:

ScheduledPatientsGrid.ProcessGridKey += ScheduledPatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey;
RecentPatientsGrid.ProcessGridKey += RecentPatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey;
RecentPatientsGrid.ProcessGridKey += RecentPatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey;

... 

private void ScheduledPatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
   ProcessGridKey(e.Key);
}

private void RecentPatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
   ProcessGridKey(e.Key);
}

private void PatientsGrid_ProcessGridKey(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
   ProcessGridKey(e.Key);
}

private void ProcessGridKey(Key e)
{
    ...
}

Your mileage may vary depending on what the shared method does, or the parameters passed in. (For example, in my above sample, I duplicate the pulling of the Key from the KeyEventArgs.

share|improve this answer

I prefer sharing, if the logic gets out of hand you can always just use the single event as a router to the correct method like...

private void ProcessGridKey(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
     if (sender is x)
          xmethod();
     if (sender is y)
          ymethod();    //etc 
}

I'm aware this syntax doesn't quite make sense as the sender will always be the same object in OP example, but you get the idea.

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