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For example, I have two lists of the same length:

a = [[1,2],[2,2],[3,3],[4,2],[5,6]]
b = [1,2,2,3,1]

I want to have a function such that

func(a,b,1) = [[1,2],[5,6]]
func(a,b,2) = [[2,2],[3,3]]
func(b,b,2) = [2,2]

What the function does is return a list of a's elements, whose corresponding elements of the same index in list b equal to the third argument.

In Matlab I will do something as easy as a(b==1), a(b==2), b(b==2). What is the most efficient way to achieve this in Python?

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4  
It is not very clear what you want this function/filter to do –  Alex W Jun 21 '12 at 20:28
    
It would be useful to actually explain what you want, rather than expect us to deduce it from input/output. Also, what have you tried? SO is not a place to get code written for you. –  Lattyware Jun 21 '12 at 20:29
2  
Ah I get it, it's: Return the values in the first argument in the positions of the elements in the second argument that are equal the third argument. –  Simeon Visser Jun 21 '12 at 20:33
    
You need to explain what you want func to do? You can't assume we know matlab nor can you assume we can deduce what func does from input/output. –  user1413793 Jun 21 '12 at 20:39
    
Sorry guys I assumed the Matlab expression explained it all. Thanks for the heads up. –  Ruofeng Jun 22 '12 at 15:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want very Matlab-like functionality, you could use numpy:

>>> import numpy
>>> a = [[1,2],[2,2],[3,3],[4,2],[5,6]]
>>> b = [1,2,2,3,1]
>>> a = numpy.array(a)
>>> b = numpy.array(b)
>>> a[b==1]
array([[1, 2],
       [5, 6]])
>>> a[b==2]
array([[2, 2],
       [3, 3]])
>>> b[b==2]
array([2, 2])

Failing that, I'd probably simply use a list comprehension:

>>> [i for i,j in zip(a,b) if j == 1]
[[1, 2], [5, 6]]
>>> [i for i,j in zip(a,b) if j == 2]
[[2, 2], [3, 3]]
>>> [i for i,j in zip(b,b) if j == 2]
[2, 2]

It'd be trivial to wrap this in a function:

>>> def func(a,b,x):
...     return [i for i,j in zip(a,b) if j == x]
... 
>>> func(a,b,2)
[[2, 2], [3, 3]]
>>> 
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I would use itertools.compress() along with a generator expression to do this:

def func(a, b, c):
    return itertools.compress(a, (x == c for x in b))

Note that this will return a generator. If you need a list, wrap it in a list() call.

>>> import itertools
>>> def func(a, b, c):
...     return list(itertools.compress(a, (x == c for x in b)))
... 
>>> a = [[1,2],[2,2],[3,3],[4,2],[5,6]]
>>> b = [1,2,2,3,1]
>>> func(a, b, 1)
[[1, 2], [5, 6]]
>>> func(a, b, 2)
[[2, 2], [3, 3]]
>>> func(b, b, 2)
[2, 2]

It's also worth noting this should be nice and fast - itertools is designed to be a fast module.

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I think I like this best of all. –  DSM Jun 21 '12 at 20:36
    
@DSM Once I got what he was going for, it jumped into mind straight away. I feel it captures what he is trying to do very well for the reader too. –  Lattyware Jun 21 '12 at 20:38
2  
Excepting the fact that "compress" is a terrible name, but I can't hold you responsible for that. :^) –  DSM Jun 21 '12 at 20:40
1  
@DSM I get what they were going for, but I agree, 'select' might have been more appropriate. I guess you can always do from itertools import compress as select if you hate it that much ;). –  Lattyware Jun 21 '12 at 20:41
    
I agree with DSM, this is probably the best thing to do, but the name confuses me. –  Junuxx Jun 21 '12 at 20:47

This first finds the indices where b equals the target values ([i for i, x in enumerate(b) if x==c]), then uses those indices to get the elements you want out of a:

def func(a,b,c):
    return [a[j] for j in [i for i, x in enumerate(b) if x==c]]

>>> func(a,b,1)
[[1, 2], [5, 6]]
>>> func(a,b,2)
[[2, 2], [3, 3]]
>>> func(b,b,2)
[2, 2]
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Well done for working that out based on what he gave - it was cryptic at best. –  Lattyware Jun 21 '12 at 20:32
    
@Lattyware: The description might not have been clear, but I thought the Matlab code was. –  Junuxx Jun 21 '12 at 20:35
    
True, if you know Matlab ;) –  Lattyware Jun 21 '12 at 20:38
    
@Junuxx no need of two for loops, see my answer. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 21 '12 at 20:54
def func(a,b,n):
   return [a[i] for i,x in enumerate(b) if x==n]

a = [[1,2],[2,2],[3,3],[4,2],[5,6]]
b = [1,2,2,3,1]
print(func(a,b,1)) #[[1, 2], [5, 6]]
print(func(a,b,2)) #[[2, 2], [3, 3]]
print(func(b,b,2)) #[2, 2]
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