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i'm having a problem while converting Timestamp objects to joda's LocalTime.

See example below:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Timestamp t = Timestamp.valueOf("1111-11-11 00:00:00");
    System.out.println(t); //-- prints '1111-11-11 00:00:00.0'
    System.out.println(new LocalDate(t)); //-- prints '1111-11-17'

    Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
    calendar.setTime(t);
    System.out.println(LocalDate.fromCalendarFields(calendar)); //-- prints '1111-11-11'
}

I could not determine why 'new LocalDate(t)' results in '1111-11-17'. Can anyone help me on that?

I notice this "problem" while using joda-time-hibernate to populate my bean's property of type LocalDate.

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Could it maybe have something to do with the difference between the Gregorian Calendar and the Julian Calendar? Do you have the same issue with 1999-11-11 00:00:00 ? –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Jun 21 '12 at 20:33
    
@RoddyoftheFrozenPeas No, i don't. System.out.println(new LocalDate(Timestamp.valueOf("1999-11-11 00:00:00"))) prints '1999-11-11'. What does that mean? –  Fabio Veronez Jun 22 '12 at 12:01
1  
I'd bet that since you're using local date, you're running into the switch from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar (what we use now). Wikipedia has a decent discussion of the topic. Basically, some countries "lost" days when they switched -- eg. the day after 9 December 1582 was 20 December 1582. I'd bet that your discrepancy has something to do with that. –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Jun 22 '12 at 14:27
    
@Roddy : you should post your comment as an answer –  leonbloy Jun 22 '12 at 18:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This indeed has to do with the different types of calendars. java.sql.Timestamp, like java.util.Date, don't have any calendar information, as they are stored solely as a number, the number of milliseconds since 1970, with the implied assumption that there was a jump between October 4 and October 15 1582, when the Gregorian calendar was officially adopted, replacing the old Julian calendar. So, you can't possibly have a Date (or Timestamp) object representing October 7, 1582. If you try to create such a date, you'll automatically end up 10 days later. For example:

    Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();
    c.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
    c.set(1582, Calendar.OCTOBER, 7, 0, 0, 0);
    c.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);
    d = c.getTime();
    System.out.println("Date: " + d);
    // Prints:
    // Date: Sun Oct 17 00:00:00 GMT 1582

In other words, Date objects have an implied Julian+Gregorian chronology, automatically switching between those two.

JodaTime is a bit smarter, it supports several Chronologies, including a continuing Julian, a proleptic Gregorian, a mixed Julian+Gregorian, and a standard ISO Chronology which is almost identical to the Gregorian one. If you read the JavaDoc of the LocalDate.fromCalendarFields method, you'll see that it mentions that:

This factory method ignores the type of the calendar and always creates a LocalDate with ISO chronology.

The mixed Julian+Gregorian chronology behaves like the implicit Java dates, with an automatic switch between the two different calendars. The pure chronologies assume that their calendar system is forever in use, so for example it assumes that the Gregorian calendar has been used since the start of time.

Let's see how each Chronology treats the 1111-11-11 date:

    Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();
    c.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
    c.set(1111, Calendar.NOVEMBER, 11, 0, 0, 0);
    c.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);
    Date d = c.getTime();
    System.out.println("Date: " + d + " (" + d.getTime() + " milliseconds)");
    System.out.println("ISO: " + new DateTime(d, ISOChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));
    System.out.println("Julian+Gregorian: " + new DateTime(d, GJChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));
    System.out.println("Julian: " + new DateTime(d, JulianChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));
    System.out.println("Gregorian: " + new DateTime(d, GregorianChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));

Ends up as:

Date: Sat Nov 11 00:00:00 GMT 1111 (-27079747200000 milliseconds)
ISO: 1111-11-18T00:00:00.000Z
Julian+Gregorian: 1111-11-11T00:00:00.000Z
Julian: 1111-11-11T00:00:00.000Z
Gregorian: 1111-11-18T00:00:00.000Z

As you can see, the two modern chronologies (ISO and Gregorian) report the correct date if they would have been in use since from the start, while the two that use the Julian calendar report the date as it was known back then, although in hindsight we know it to be off by 7 days compared to the true equinox date.

Let's see what happened around the switch:

    c.set(1582, Calendar.OCTOBER, 15, 0, 0, 0);
    d = c.getTime();
    System.out.println("Date: " + d + " (" + d.getTime() + " milliseconds)");
    System.out.println("ISO: " + new DateTime(d, ISOChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));
    System.out.println("Julian+Gregorian: " + new DateTime(d, GJChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));
    System.out.println("Julian: " + new DateTime(d, JulianChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));
    System.out.println("Gregorian: " + new DateTime(d, GregorianChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));

ends up as:

Date: Fri Oct 15 00:00:00 GMT 1582 (-12219292800000 milliseconds)
ISO: 1582-10-15T00:00:00.000Z
Julian+Gregorian: 1582-10-15T00:00:00.000Z
Julian: 1582-10-05T00:00:00.000Z
Gregorian: 1582-10-15T00:00:00.000Z

So the only one that's left behind is the Julian calendar. That was a valid date in all the countries that didn't accept the Gregorian calendar yet, which back then was a lot of countries. Greece made the switch in 1923...

One millisecond before that, the date was:

    c.add(Calendar.MILLISECOND, -1);
    d = c.getTime();
    System.out.println("Date: " + d + " (" + d.getTime() + " milliseconds)");
    System.out.println("ISO: " + new DateTime(d, ISOChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));
    System.out.println("Julian+Gregorian: " + new DateTime(d, GJChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));
    System.out.println("Julian: " + new DateTime(d, JulianChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));
    System.out.println("Gregorian: " + new DateTime(d, GregorianChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("UTC"))));

Meaning:

Date: Thu Oct 04 23:59:59 GMT 1582 (-12219292800001 milliseconds)
ISO: 1582-10-14T23:59:59.999Z
Julian+Gregorian: 1582-10-04T23:59:59.999Z
Julian: 1582-10-04T23:59:59.999Z
Gregorian: 1582-10-14T23:59:59.999Z

The ISO and Gregorian chronologies report a date that didn't actually exist in the Gregorian calendar, since there was no Gregorian calendar before October 15, yet this date is valid in an extended, proleptic Gregorian calendar. It's like finding a BCE date inscribed on a BCE monument... Nobody knew that they were before Christ before Christ was even born.

So, the root of the problem is that a date string is ambiguous, since you don't know in which calendar you're measuring. Is the year 5772 a year in the future, or is it the current Hebrew year? Java assumes a mixed Julian+Gregorian calendar. JodaTime provides extensive support for different calendars, and by default it assumes the ISO8601 chronology. Your date is automatically converted from the Julian calendar in use in 1111 to the ISO chronology that we currently use. If you want your JodaTime-enhanced timestamps to use the same chronology as the java.sql.Timestamp class, then explicitly select the GJChronology when constructing JodaTime objects.

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The reason this is happening for dates several centuries in the past has to do with the (worldwide) switch to the Gregorian Calendar from the Julian Calendar. Basically, as countries implemented the new calendar system in a piecemeal fashion, they would lose days or weeks (and in some cases, months) in the process. In Spain, for example, 4 October 1582 in the Julian calendar was followed immediately by 15 October 1582 in the Gregorian calendar. Wikipedia has a decent discussion of the topic.

As long as your application does not deal with dates too far in the past, you won't have to deal with discrepancies related to this. As you mentioned in your comment, System.out.println(new LocalDate(Timestamp.valueOf("1999-11-11 00:00:00"))) correctly outputted 1999-11-11. If you need to work with these older dates, I'd suggest looking into an alternative date for the Julian calendar.

(As an aside, I'd be curious to see what would happen if you asked for the local date, in Spain, of 5 October 1582 ... a day which never happened.)

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2  
new DateTime("1582-10-05", GJChronology.getInstance(DateTimeZone.forID("Europe/Madrid"))); --> IllegalFieldValueException: Cannot parse "1582-10-05": Value 5 for dayOfMonth is not supported –  boneill Jul 11 '12 at 4:35

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