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The script I have written outputs all lines from the file 2 that starts with a number that is in the file 1.

Question

How do I output all the other lines that didn't matched?

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my @res;

open(FILE, '<', "1") or die $!;
while (defined (my $line = <FILE>)) {
  chomp $line;
  push @res, $line;
}
close FILE;

open(FILE, '<', "2") or die $!;
while (defined (my $line = <FILE>)) {
  chomp $line;
  $line =~ m/(\d+)/;

  if (defined $1) {
    foreach my $a (@res) {
      if ($a == $1) {
        print $line . "\n";
      }
    }
  }
}
close FILE;

File 1

155
156
157
158
159
160

File 2

150 a
151 f
152 r
153 a
154 a
155 a
156 a
157 f
158 f
159 f
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4  
Note that if your platform provides a POSIX-compatible grep command, you can replace your script with grep -f1 2 and grep -v -f1 2. (The first if you want the current script; the second if you want raina77ow's version.) –  sarnold Jun 21 '12 at 21:22
    
The defined in while (defined (my $line = <FILE>)) is redundant. However, the benefits of using lexical filehandles in the smallest applicable scope rather than package-global bareword filehandles are not. –  Sinan Ünür Jun 22 '12 at 1:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your answer is pretty close actually: it's enough to change this

foreach my $a (@res) {
  if ($a == $1) {
    print $line . "\n";
  }
}

... to this ...

my $found;
foreach my $a (@res) {
  if ($a eq $1) { # we compare strings, not numbers, even if these strings are 'numeric'
    $found = 1;
    print $line . "\n";
    last; # no need to look further, we already found an item
  }
}
print "Not matched: $line", "\n" unless $found; 

Yet still there's something to talk about. ) See, as all these number strings in the first file are unique, it's much better to use a hash for storing them. The code will actually not change that much:

my %digits;
... # in the first file processing loop:
$digits{$line} = 1;
... # in the second file processing loop, instead of foreach:
if ($digits{$1}) { 
  print $line, "\n"; 
} else {
  print "Not matched: $line", "\n";
}

But the point is that searching in hash is MUCH faster than looping through an array again and again. )

share|improve this answer
    
.. are you going to talk about using a hash instead of a list? –  sarnold Jun 21 '12 at 21:23
1  
Of course. ) This task is literally begging for hash to be introduced. ) –  raina77ow Jun 21 '12 at 21:25
use strict;
use warnings;

my %res;

open(FILE, '<', "1") or die $!;
while (defined (my $line = <FILE>)) {
  chomp $line;
  $res{$line} = 1;
}
close FILE;

open(FILE, '<', "2") or die $!;
while (defined (my $line = <FILE>)) {
  if ($line =~ m/(\d+)/) {
      print $line if not $res{$1};
  }
}
close FILE;
share|improve this answer

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