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I have seen multiple threads with people having the same problem, but it seems solutions have been offered on a case-by-case basis due to the unique nature of the problem

Here's my code:

loga = [(912, "Message A1") , (1000, "Message A2") , (988, "Message A3") , (1012, "Message A4") , (1002, "Message A5")]
logb = [(926, "Message B1") , (1008, "Message B2") , (996, "Message B3") , (1019, "Message B4") , (1100, "Message B5")]
logc = [(1056,"Message C1") , (1033, "Message C2") , (999, "Message C3") , (1054, "Message C4") , (1086, "Message C5")]
logs = [loga, logb, logc]
out = []


def find_lowest_i(lst):
    for i in range(len(lst)):
        log = lst[i]
        if log:
            t = log[0][0]
            if i==0 or t < lowest_t:
                lowest_i = i
                lowest_t = t
    return lowest_i

while True:
    i = find_lowest_i(logs)
    print "i=", i
    tpl = logs[i].pop(0)
    print tpl
    out.append(tpl)
    print out

And my exact error:

"Message File Name Line Position Traceback 19 find_lowest_i 13
UnboundLocalError: local variable 'lowest_t' referenced before assignment"

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Not really sure what trouble you're having... –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 22 '12 at 1:42

1 Answer 1

Due to the continuous poping, one of the logs (with this data, the first log) will eventually be empty:

logs = [[],
       [(1019, 'Message B4'), (1100, 'Message B5')],
       [(1056, 'Message C1'), (1033, 'Message C2'), (999, 'Message C3'),
        (1054, 'Message C4'), (1086, 'Message C5')]]

In this situation, if log will fail for i=0, and lowest_t is not initialized. On the next iteration, i=1, there is a log but no lowest_t. Exception!

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@Ned: No, that is incorrect, see my comment on your answer. –  Junuxx Jun 22 '12 at 2:20
    
You are correct, sorry. –  Ned Batchelder Jun 22 '12 at 2:26
    
Ahh I see! This makes sense. It's probably obvious that I'm not very advanced with python. Would I use an exception? –  Raj Jun 22 '12 at 16:09

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