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So I'm taking 10000 2 page pdf files and merging them into one with iTextSharp.

This is some loose code of what I'm doing:

Document document = new Document();
using(PdfWriter writer = PdfWriter.GetInstance(document, new FileStream("merged.pdf", FileMode.Create)))
{  

    PdfContentByte cb = writer.DirectContent;
    PdfReader reader = null;
    foreach(string thisFile in files)
    {
       reader = new PdfReader(thisFile);
       var page1 = writer.GetImportedPage(reader, 1);
       var page2 = writer.GetImportedPage(reader, 2);
       cb.AddTemplate(page1, 1f, 0, 0, 1f, 0, 0);
       cb.AddTemplate(page2, 1f, 0, 0, 1f, 0, 0);
    }
}

I'm trying to understand where the bottlenecks could be in two places. I ran some performance tests and the slowest processes are naturally reading in each file with PdfReader and the dispose that's saving the file, its called from the using PdfWriter block.

I'm getting about 25% utilization on all 16 cores for this process. I tried a solid state drive instead of my SATA 7.2k rpm drive and it's almost the exact same speed.

How can I speed this process up? There's no distributing the task because the read speed between computers would be even slower. Even if it means changing to another language,library or writing this lower level, I need to get this process done much faster than I currently am. Right now it takes about 10 minutes for the merge.

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2 Answers 2

So I finally solved this. Here are my performance results with code of the winning approach below: I used the same machine on all three of theses tests

  • iTextSharp - content builder directly on a pdfwriter
    • Windows 2008 64 bit
    • NTFS partition
    • merges about 30 pages per second during processing
    • significant overhead at the end when closing out the pdfwriter
    • 25 pages per second over all
  • iTextSharp - PDFCopy
    • Windows 2008 64 bit
    • NTFS partition
    • writes the output to disk instead of memory so no overhead at the end
    • 40 pages per second
  • iText (java) - PDFCopy (exact same code, just ported to java)
    • Ubuntu 12.04 64 bit server edition
    • EXT3 partition (going to try ext4 soon)
    • also writes the output to disk during processing
    • 250 pages per second

Haven't tried to figure out why the same code runs faster in java on Ubuntu but I'll take it. In general I defined all major variables outside of this function since it gets called 36000 times during this process.

public void addPage(String inputPdf, String barcodeText, String pageTitle)
{
    try
    {
        //read in the pdf
        reader = new PdfReader(inputPdf);

        //all pdfs must have 2 pages (front and back). 
        //set to throw an out of bounds error if not. caught up stream
        for (int i = 1; i <= Math.Min(reader.NumberOfPages,2); i++)
        {
            //import the page from source pdf
            copiedPage = copyPdf.GetImportedPage(reader, i);

            // add the page to the new document
            copyPdf.AddPage(copiedPage);
        }

        //cleanup this page, keeps a big memory leak away
        copyPdf.FreeReader(reader);
        copyPdf.Flush();

    }
    finally
    {
        reader.Close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the tip about FreeReader. I'm not so sure you need the call to Flush though, which might cause some extra overhead because all buffers must be written to disk. –  JBert Nov 16 '13 at 16:32

Give the PdfSmartCopy a try. Not sure if it's faster or not.

Document document = new Document();
using(PdfWriter writer = new PdfSmartCopy(document, new FileStream("merged.pdf", FileMode.Create)))
{  
    document.Open();
    PdfReader reader = null;
    foreach(string thisFile in files)
    {
       reader = new PdfReader(thisFile);
       ((PdfSmartCopy)writer).AddPage(writer.GetImportedPage(reader , 1));
       ((PdfSmartCopy)writer).AddPage(writer.GetImportedPage(reader , 2));
    }

    if(reader != null)
    {
       reader.Close();
    }
}
document.Close();
share|improve this answer
    
same speed to the second –  brandon Jun 22 '12 at 19:40

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