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I am having trouble figuring out a decent way of randomly shuffling the elements in an std::vector and, after some operations, restoring the original order. I know that this should be a rather trivial algorithm, but I guess I'm too tired...

Since I am constrained to use a custom random number generator class, I guess I can't use std::random_shuffle, which doesn't help anyway, because I also need to preserve the original order. So, my approach was to create an std::map which serves as a mapping between the original positions and the random ones, like this:

std::map<unsigned int, unsigned int> getRandomPermutation (const unsigned int &numberOfElements)
{
    std::map<unsigned int, unsigned int> permutation;

    //populate the map
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < numberOfElements; i++)
    {
        permutation[i] = i;
    }

    //randomize it
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < numberOfElements; i++)
    {
        //generate a random number in the interval [0, numberOfElements)
        unsigned long randomValue = GetRandomInteger(numberOfElements - 1U);

        //broken swap implementation
        //permutation[i] = randomValue;
        //permutation[randomValue] = i;

        //use this instead:
        std::swap(permutation[i], permutation[randomValue]);
    }

    return permutation;
}

I am not sure that the above algorithm is a proper implementation for a random permutation, so any improvements are welcome.

Now, here is how I've managed to make use of this permutation map:

std::vector<BigInteger> doStuff (const std::vector<BigInteger> &input)
{
    /// Permute the values in a random order
    std::map<unsigned int, unsigned int> permutation = getRandomPermutation(static_cast<unsigned int>(input.size()));

    std::vector<BigInteger> temp;

    //permute values
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < static_cast<unsigned int>(input.size()); ++i)
    {
        temp.push_back(input[permutation[i]]);
    }

    //do all sorts of stuff with temp

    /// Reverse the permutation
    std::vector<BigInteger> output;
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < static_cast<unsigned int>(input.size()); ++i)
    {
        output.push_back(temp[permutation[i]]);
    }

    return output;
}

Something tells me that I should be able to use only one std::vector<BigInteger> for this algorithm, but, right now, I just can't figure out the optimal solution. Honestly, I don't really care about the data in input, so I could even make it non-const, overwrite it, and skip creating a copy of it, but the question is how to implement the algorithm?

If I do something like this, I end up shooting myself in the foot, right? :)

for (unsigned int i = 0; i < static_cast<unsigned int>(input.size()); ++i)
{
    BigInteger aux = input[i];
    input[i] = input[permutation[i]];
    input[permutation[i]] = aux;
}

EDIT: Following Steve's remark about using "Fisher-Yates" shuffle, I changed my getRandomPermutation function accordingly:

std::map<unsigned int, unsigned int> getRandomPermutation (const unsigned int &numberOfElements)
{
    std::map<unsigned int, unsigned int> permutation;

    //populate the map
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < numberOfElements; i++)
    {
        permutation[i] = i;
    }

    //randomize it
    for (unsigned int i = numberOfElements - 1; i > 0; --i)
    {
        //generate a random number in the interval [0, numberOfElements)
        unsigned long randomValue = GetRandomInteger(i);

        std::swap(permutation[i], permutation[randomValue]);
    }

    return permutation;
}
share|improve this question
1  
May I recommend bogosort it'll solve both your problems. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bogosort –  Skyler Saleh Jun 22 '12 at 1:31
1  
Why not save the state of the original list; and when done shuffling, just reassign your saved list to the shuffled one? –  Brendan Jun 22 '12 at 2:02
    
@Brendan I need to preserve only the order, not the contents of the list. This is part of a secure interactive protocol, which requires that the items in the list are randomly shuffled before doing interactions, and, after the protocol finishes, I need to restore the original order. –  Mihai Todor Jun 22 '12 at 9:24
    
@RTS Could you please elaborate your idea? –  Mihai Todor Jun 22 '12 at 9:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're looking for specific errors in your code:

permutation[i] = randomValue;
permutation[randomValue] = i;

is wrong. Observe that once you're finished, each value does not necessarily appear exactly once among the values of the map. So it's not a permutation, let alone a uniformly-distributed random one.

The proper means to generate a random permutation is what Tony says, use std::random_shuffle on a vector that initially represents the identity permutation. Or if you want to know how a shuffle is properly performed, look up "Fisher-Yates". In general, any approach that makes N random selections uniformly from 0 .. N-1 is doomed to failure, because that means it has N^N possible ways it can run. But there are N! possible permutations of N items, and N^N is generally not divisible by N!. Hence it's impossible for each permutation to be the result of an equal number of random selections, i.e. the distribution is not uniform.

the question is how to implement the algorithm?

So, you have your permutation, and you want to re-order the elements of input in-place, according to that permutation.

The key thing to know is that every permutation is a composition of "cycles". That is to say, if you repeatedly follow the permutation from a given starting point, you come back to where you started (and this path is the cycle to which that starting point belongs). There may be more than one such cycle in a given permutation, and if permutation[i] == i for some i, then the cycle of i has length 1.

The cycles are all disjoint, that is to say each element appears in exactly one cycle. Because cycles don't "interfere" with each other, we can apply a permutation by applying each cycle, and we can do the cycles in any order. So, for each index i we need to:

  • check whether we've already done i. If so, move on to the next index.
  • set current = i
  • swap index[current] with index[permutation[current]]. So index[current] is set to its correct value (the next element in the cycle), and its old value is "pushed" forward along the cycle.
  • mark current as "done"
  • if permutuation[current] is i, we've finished the cycle. So the first value of the cycle ends up in the spot formerly occupied by the last element of the cycle, which is right. Move on to the next index.
  • set current = permutation[current] and go back to the swap step.

Depending on the types involved, you can optimize around the swaps - it may be better to copy/move to a temporary variable and the start of each cycle, then do a copy/move instead of a swap at each step of the cycle, and finally copy/move the temporary to the end of the cycle.

Reversing the process is the same, but using the "inverse" of the permutation. The inverse inv of a permutation perm, is the permutation such that inv[perm[i]] == i for each i. You can either compute the inverse and use the exact code above, or you can use code similar to the above, except move the elements in the opposite direction along each cycle.

An alternative to all that, since you implemented Fisher-Yates yourself -- as you're running Fisher-Yates, for each swap you perform record the two indices swapped in a vector<pair<size_t,size_t>>. Then you don't have to worry about cycles. You can apply the permutation to the vector by applying the same sequence of swaps. You can reverse the permutation by applying the reversed sequence of swaps.

share|improve this answer
    
Regarding the correction, actually, it works. I don't see how I could ever end up with any duplicates, no matter how many iterations I perform. Thanks for the "Fisher-Yates" (Knuth shuffle) suggestion. I remember now seeing it somewhere, but, it was really late last evening :) –  Mihai Todor Jun 22 '12 at 9:32
    
@MihaiTodor: sorry, maybe I misread the code then, it was a bit late last night. My thought was, "suppose that randomValue just so happens to come out 0 every time". Then your permutation map will have all zeros as values, except that permutation[0] will be equal to numberOfElements - 1. Sorry if that's wrong. –  Steve Jessop Jun 22 '12 at 9:35
    
The funny thing is that if randomValue turns out to be 0 every time, then my permutation will end up being the identity permutation. Remember that permutation is an std::map, not an std::vector. Now, I'm trying to comprehend your comment regarding the number of iterations, but it's giving me a hard time. Could you please provide a concrete example? I see it as just an issue regarding the number of iterations I perform. If I only do N iterations, then the maths says that I will not end up with a properly shuffled permutation, right? –  Mihai Todor Jun 22 '12 at 9:51
1  
"Remember that permutation is an std::map, not an std::vector" -- I don't see how this makes a difference. In your original code, if you do for (unsigned int i = 0; i < numberOfElements; i++) { permutation[i] = 0; permutation[0] = i; }, then you end up with a whole lot of zeros, no matter what kind of container permutation is. –  Steve Jessop Jun 22 '12 at 10:27
1  
@Mihai: Btw, if your RNG works from a seed, then when permuting you can perform the swaps on input and do without permutation, that's exactly what random_shuffle does. When reversing the permutation, you can re-seed the RNG with the same seed, then record the swaps into a vector (or std::stack), and then replay them backwards on input. So if your RNG is reproducible, you only actually need to store the swaps briefly. –  Steve Jessop Jun 22 '12 at 12:33

If you're "randomising" a vector of n elements, you can create another std::vector<size_t> index(n), set index[x] = x for 0 <= x < n, then shuffle index. Then your lookups take the form: original_vector[index[i]]. The order of the original vector's never changed so no need to restore ordering.

...constrained to use a custom random number generator class, I guess I can't use std::random_shuffle...

Have you noticed this overload?

template <class RandomAccessIterator, class RandomNumberGenerator>
void random_shuffle ( RandomAccessIterator first, RandomAccessIterator last,
                    RandomNumberGenerator& rand );

For details of how to wrap your random number generator with a compatible object, see http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/RandomNumberGenerator.html

share|improve this answer
1  
"set index[x] = x for 0 <= x < N" using the finally-exists-at-long-last std::iota, where available :-) –  Steve Jessop Jun 22 '12 at 1:46
    
Oh, and even if you do have to change the original vector for some reason, you can use the index vector to do so, and use it again to reverse the process. This is done by following the cycles in the permutation defined by the index vector. –  Steve Jessop Jun 22 '12 at 1:49
    
Unfortunately, since this would be an interactive protocol, I am not allowed to send the index vector along with the original_vector. If I were to use std::random_shuffle, I would need to wrap it up in some custom class (template), because I am unable to plugin my random number generator out of the box. –  Mihai Todor Jun 22 '12 at 9:40
    
@Mihai: random_shuffle has an optional third argument to specify a source of random numbers. –  Steve Jessop Jun 22 '12 at 9:53
    
@SteveJessop Yes, but it has this signature: Pointer to unary function taking one argument and returning a value, both of the appropriate difference type (generally ptrdiff_t). The function shall return a value between zero and its argument (lower than this). which implies that I need to wrap my custom generator in some function, and, honestly, I don't think it's worth the effort. I just converted my code to use the "Fisher-Yates" shuffle and I'm OK with this. All that remains is to see if I can improve the way I use my permutation map. –  Mihai Todor Jun 22 '12 at 10:06

Note that, depending on your application, if it is important that you have a truly uniformly distributed permutation, you cannot use any algorithm that calls a typical pseudo-random number generator more that once.

The reason is that most pseudo-random number generators, such as the one in clib, are Linear congruential. Those have a weakness where they'll generate numbers that cluster in planes - so your permutations will not be perfectly uniformly distributed. Using a higher-quality generator should get around that.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_congruential_generator

Alternatively, you could just generate a single random number in the range 0..(n!-1) and pass it to the unrank function for permutations. For small enough n, you can store those and get a constant time algorithm, but if n is too large for that, the best unrank function is O(n). Applying the resulting permutation is going to be O(n) anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
I am using the GMP library to generate random numbers, which implements the Mersenne Twister algorithm. Even though this is slow, I am supposed to pre-generate a cache of random numbers anyway, so I think this will suffice for now. The code is not intended to end up in production anyway. It's just for doing some cryptographic protocol simulations. –  Mihai Todor Feb 27 '13 at 23:47

Given a ordered sequence of elements a,b,c,d,e you first create a new indexed sequence: X=(0,a),(1,b),(2,c),(3,d),(4,e). Then, you randomly shuffle that sequence and obtain the second element of each pair to get the random sequence. To restore the original sequence you sort the X set incrementally using the first element of each pair.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, yes, but this would involve changing my vector implementation from std::vector to std::map, which is not something that I want, because, after applying the permutation, I would have to clone its contents in a temporary std::vector –  Mihai Todor Jun 22 '12 at 9:44
    
The answer works nicely however if you make it (0,&a),(1,&b),(2,&c),(3,&d),(4,&e), storing pointers to the elements rather than the elements themselves, assuming that the vector of elements is not altered in the interim (which would invalidate the pointers). –  thb Jun 22 '12 at 10:25
    
@thb That could be an interesting approach. I will think about it... –  Mihai Todor Jun 22 '12 at 12:11

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