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I'm attempting to make a background image that is set using background-image fade out as the page gets narrower. I'm pretty sure it can be done using CSS transitions, but I'm fairly unfamiliar with them. I guess what I'm asking is, can you make a background image transition out based on a media query?

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What do you mean by "page gets narrower"? Media queries, as suggested by the name, are typically used to style your page based on information about the media or device that your page is being viewed from. For example, device-width and orientation might be something you check with media queries. If you just mean the browser window size, then you might want to look at other solutions. Here is some more info on media queries –  Zhihao Jun 22 '12 at 1:39
    
I did mean the browser width. I just wanted a nice transition to get rid of a a background image when the browser window got narrower. deltab's second answer worked perfectly. –  Patrick Sparks Jun 22 '12 at 3:45
    
Then you should mark his answer as the correct one. –  Koveras Jun 22 '12 at 14:59

3 Answers 3

Yes, you can. I made a couple of live examples:

@media screen and (max-width: 400px) {
    div { background: navy; }
}

@media screen and (min-width: 400px) {
    div { background: green; }
}
div {
    transition: background 2s linear;
    width: 400px; text-align: center; color: white;
}
@media screen and (max-width: 400px) {
    div { opacity: 0; }
}
@media screen and (min-width: 400px) {
    div { opacity: 1; }
}
div {
    background: url(http://placekitten.com/400/300/);
    transition: opacity 1s linear;
    width: 400px; height: 300px; text-align: center; color: white;
}

I cheated a bit because fading out background images is not widely supported, but try the proposed cross-fade() syntax (example at http://peter.sh/files/examples/cross-fading.html).

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Brilliant. You should really include the code here though instead of just a link to jsFiddle. –  Koveras Jun 22 '12 at 3:00
    
That did the first one and it worked! thanks! –  Patrick Sparks Jun 22 '12 at 3:25
    
seriously though you made my night. –  Patrick Sparks Jun 22 '12 at 4:06

yes u can here is a good article on this http://blog.w3conversions.com/2011/03/changing-a-background-image-with-css3-transitions/ but i will suggest to use javascript as css will have compatibility issues here is a good link for doing this with JS http://fx.inetcat.com/

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According to Oli Studholme, background-image is not an animatable property:

The CSS Working Group is aware of these issues, and for example transitioning background-image is being worked on, so I expect this will change in the future!

However, background-color is an animatable property, so this works:

body {
    background-color: #666;
    height: 100%;
    -moz-transition: background-color 1s ease;
}
@media screen and (max-width: 800px) {
    body {
        background-color: #ccc;
        -moz-transition: background-color 1s ease;
    }
}
@media screen and (max-width: 400px) {
    body {
        background-color: #fff;
        -moz-transition: background-color 1s ease;
    }
}

Of course, there's no gradient. This doesn't use CSS transitions, but kinda sorta simulates the same thing:

body {
    background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #369, #000);
    height: 100%;
}
@media screen and (max-width: 800px) {
    body {
        background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #036, #000);
    }
}
@media screen and (max-width: 400px) {
    body {
        background: #000;
    }
}

Just use the respective properties depending on the browsers you want to support.

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