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SELECT 
	*
FROM 
	myTable
WHERE 
	field1 LIKE 'match0' AND
	myfunc(t1.hardwareConfig) LIKE 'match1'

Here is my question,

the matching of field1 is fast and quick, but myfunc takes forever to return and I want to make sure that if field1 doesn't match that it doesn't even attempt to do myfunc.

Will SQL just know this or can I make it explicit in my query?

I'm on MSSQL 2000, 2005 and 2008, hopefully there's a common answer.

share|improve this question
1  
What is mysp? It can't be a stored procedure since you can't use them that way. – John Saunders Jul 11 '09 at 23:37
    
err i meant function -- instead of stored procedure. – Matt Jul 11 '09 at 23:48
    
Have a look at the other answers aside from the best answer. The answer may well be that you don't need to worry about it: SQL will figure it out for you. – Dan Rosenstark Jul 12 '09 at 9:52
up vote 7 down vote accepted

To enforce the order in which conditions are evaluated, use the following approach, because it is documented that CASE preserves the order in which conditions are evaluated.

SELECT 
        *
FROM 
        myTable
WHERE 
  CASE WHEN field1 LIKE 'match0' THEN 
    CASE WHEN myfunc(t1.hardwareConfig) LIKE 'match1' 
      THEN 1 
    END 
  END = 1

The following article explains it in good detail: Predicates in SQL

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There's a lot that goes on behind the scenes to determine how a query is executed, but in this situation I would expect for it to filter on the field1 first. Note that this isn't a guarantee - the query optimizer can make some strange choices now and then. Additionally, you can improve your chances by using the '=' operator rather than the 'LIKE' operator.

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mysp can't be a stored procedure. It has to be a user defined function (which you should have qualified with its schema name, by the way). A user defined function is restricted to be side-effect free and should adhere to some rules. Essentially, SQL Server will combine the query and execute it as a single module with a single execution plan. It's not procedural function calling as you might expect. SQL describes what to do, not how to do it and the query optimizer will generate a plan that responds to your complete query, not each part of it separately. The same is true for views.

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In SQL Server Management Studio (for 2008 and I think 2005), you can tell it to show you the execution plan. Press Control-M in the query window. Then execute the query. That will show you the detail.

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Is myfunc just a complex calculation or does the return value change frequently. I am wondering because if it doesn't change that often and this is a frequently executed query, it may be better design to have an after insert trigger calculate the value and store it in the table as a separate column. Then you don't have to worry about which order things are evaluated in. The query may even run faster, especially if you have an index on both columns.

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