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I'd like to do a cut with a guaranteed number of levels returned. So i'd like to take any vector of cumulative percentages and get a cut into deciles. I've tried using cut and it works well in most situations, but in cases where there are deciles that have a large percentages it fails to return the desired number of unique cuts, which is 10. Any ideas on how to ensure that the number of cuts is guaranteed to be 10?

In the included example there is no occurrance of decile 7.

> (x <- c(0.04,0.1,0.22,0.24,0.26,0.3,0.35,0.52,0.62,0.66,0.68,0.69,0.76,0.82,1.41,6.19,9.05,18.34,19.85,20.5,20.96,31.85,34.33,36.05,36.32,43.56,44.19,53.33,58.03,72.46,73.4,77.71,78.81,79.88,84.31,90.07,92.69,99.14,99.95))
 [1]  0.04  0.10  0.22  0.24  0.26  0.30  0.35  0.52  0.62  0.66  0.68  0.69  0.76  0.82  1.41  6.19  9.05 18.34 19.85 20.50 20.96 31.85 34.33
[24] 36.05 36.32 43.56 44.19 53.33 58.03 72.46 73.40 77.71 78.81 79.88 84.31 90.07 92.69 99.14 99.95
> (cut(x,seq(0,max(x),max(x)/10),labels=FALSE))
 [1]  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  2  2  3  3  4  4  4  4  5  5  6  6  8  8  8  8  8  9 10 10 10 10
> (as.integer(cut2(x,seq(0,max(x),max(x)/10))))
 [1]  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  2  2  3  3  4  4  4  4  5  5  6  6  8  8  8  8  8  9 10 10 10 10
> (findInterval(x,seq(0,max(x),max(x)/10),rightmost.closed=TRUE,all.inside=TRUE))
 [1]  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  2  2  3  3  4  4  4  4  5  5  6  6  8  8  8  8  8  9 10 10 10 10

I would like to get 10 approximately equally sized intervals, sized in such a way that I am assured of getting 10. cut et al gives 9 bins with this example, i want 10. So I'm looking for an algorithm that would recognize that the break between [58.03,72.46],73.4 is large. Instead of assigning to bins 6,8,8 it would assign these cases to bins 6,7,8.

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Use quantile to identify the true deciles? –  mnel Jun 22 '12 at 2:19
2  
perhaps cut2 from Hmisc package has what your after? I think it's the g= parameter FWIW –  Chase Jun 22 '12 at 2:38
    
cut2 with g= does quantiles –  darckeen Jun 22 '12 at 6:46
    
Did you actually even try cut2? Because for me it give me ten intervals, with at least one observation in each interval. –  joran Jun 22 '12 at 12:51
    
@joran, I really don't understand what darckeen intends to do with this, but I think that what he wants is the data cut into intervals of roughly equal ranges (in this example, bins where the difference between the max and min in the bin is near 10), and where all intervals have at least one observation. Still, I can't actually imagine what the purpose of this exercise would be.... –  Ananda Mahto Jun 23 '12 at 5:10

4 Answers 4

xx <- cut(x, breaks=quantile(x, (1:10)/10, na.rm=TRUE) )
table(xx)
#------------------------
    xx
(0.256,0.58] (0.58,0.718] (0.718,6.76]  (6.76,20.5] 
           4            4            4            4 
 (20.5,35.7]  (35.7,49.7]  (49.7,75.1]  (75.1,85.5] 
           3            4            4            4 
  (85.5,100] 
           4 
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quantile gives bins with an approximately equal number of observations. i'd like approximately equally sized intervals instead. –  darckeen Jun 22 '12 at 5:02

Not sure I understand what you need, but if you drop the labels=FALSE and use table to make a frequency table of your data, you will get the number of categories desired:

> table(cut(x, breaks=seq(0, 100, 10)))

(0,10]  (10,20]  (20,30]  (30,40]  (40,50]  (50,60]  (60,70]  (70,80]  (80,90] (90,100] 
   17        2        2        4        2        2        0        5        1        4

Notice that there are is no data in the 7th category, (60,70].

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I would like there to be atleast one occurrance in each bin. Having no occurances of the 7th bin is what i'd like to remedy. –  darckeen Jun 22 '12 at 4:59
1  
This seems like a strange problem you're trying to solve. For example, how would you deal with a bimodal data where there is no density in the middle? –  Jason Morgan Jun 22 '12 at 19:53

What is the problem you are trying to solve? If you don't want quantiles, then your cutpoints are pretty much arbitrary, so you could just as easily create ten bins by sampling without replacement from your original dataset. I realize that's an absurd method, but I want to make a point: you may be way off track but we can't tell because you haven't explained what you intend to do with your bins. Why, for example, is it so bad that one bin has no content?

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numBins = 10
cut(x, breaks = seq(from = min(x), to = max(x), length.out = numBins+1))

Output:

...
...
...
10 Levels: (0.04,10] (10,20] (20,30] (30,40] (40,50] (50,60] ... (90,100]

This will make 10 bins that are approximately equally spaced. Note, that by changing the numBins variable, you may obtain any number of bins that are approximately equally spaced.

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