Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Suppose I have a doc structure like this:

thing: {
  name: {
    first: "John",
    last: "Doe"
  }
}

say I want to update the last name only. Which command do I send to update?

$set: {
  name: {
    first: "Connor"
  }
}

or

$set: {
  "name.first": "Connor"
}

Is there a difference? Or a preference? I much prefer the first since it resembles the actual document, but mongodb documentation uses the second method.

share|improve this question
    
You meant to write MongoDb uses the first method, right? mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Updating#Updating-%24set – McGarnagle Jun 22 '12 at 5:17
    
hmmm well i guess they use both. is there a difference? – Jonathan Ong Jun 22 '12 at 5:18
2  
The difference is that the first option will delete your last name, since you're setting name to the object after it, which only contains first. – Eve Freeman Jun 22 '12 at 5:29
    
Also, I think you meant "update the first name only", above. – Eve Freeman Jun 22 '12 at 5:30
up vote 3 down vote accepted

$set command will take the key and overwrite whatever was stored in it by the value you pass. So in this case

$set: {
  name: {
    first: "Connor"
  }
}

the whole subdocument name with potentially rich structure is getting replaced with a simple {first: 'Connor'}.

Similar thing is happening in the second case, only it is one level deeper. In this case it's a string, but it could be a hash as well.

$set: {
  "name.first": "Connor"
}

You can update fields at arbitrary depth level by constructing proper dotted name. Here's a slightly contrived example

db.collection.update(query, {$set: {'stats.daily.20120622.mainpage.visited': 1}});
share|improve this answer
    
just the answer i needed. thanks! – Jonathan Ong Jun 22 '12 at 7:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.