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Please input string: Python and Perl are programming languages

Python
Perl
and
are 
programming
languages

I want an input to be split but the upper case words go on top. I am thinking of using two lists: one with the title case words and one with lower. I am trying to use an if statement to place the words in a certain list. Please suggest some ideas!

Thanks

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1  
please show us some code... – avasal Jun 22 '12 at 7:06
    
What have you tried? What about it isn't working? – lvc Jun 22 '12 at 7:07
    
question not clear – Fivesheep Jun 22 '12 at 7:10
3  
it's your homework? – Zagorulkin Dmitry Jun 22 '12 at 7:11

Your example output is wrong, because it would look like this:

Perl
Python
and
are
languages
programming

Sorting by capital first would result in Perl above Python because e comes first. Additionally, because uppercase comes first you can simply do

print "\n".join(sorted(a.split()))

to get the desired result.

EDIT: After rereading the question I came up with this fix/output:

print "\n".join(sorted(a.split(), key=lambda x: x >= 'a'))

Output:

Python
Perl
and
are
programming
languages

Explanation: sorting functions in Python are stable, which means the order of elements is preserved relative to each other if they have the same comparison key. The key function will assign a value of True to anything that is greater or equal to 'a' (which is any string starting with a lowercase letter), else False. False compares smaller than True, so anything uppercase is moved to front, without changing the order of uppercase or lowercase words.

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But this changes the order of words. – pepr Jun 22 '12 at 7:33
    
Oh ... I think I misunderstood the question. I'll correct :P Fixed. – hochl Jun 22 '12 at 7:33
    
My +1. Nice solution, even though one have to think more about how it works. Also, the sort algorithm must be stable (i.e. preserving order of items with the same key). – pepr Jun 22 '12 at 13:02
    
Of course :) Please note that this is guaranteed by Python since version 2.2, see here. – hochl Jun 22 '12 at 14:25

If it is a homework, you should give it a tag "homework". Anyway, the idea to use two lists is not bad.

  1. Initialize the two lists to empty ones.
  2. Split the input sentence using the .split() method of the string to get the words.
  3. Use the split expression directly in the for loop to process the extracted words.
  4. If word is the string variable, then word[0] is its first character. If it is less or equal to 'Z' it is a capitalized word and should be appended to the wanted list.
  5. Use '\n'.join(lst) to get the multiline string out of the list of words.
share|improve this answer
    
@hochl: Thanks for fixing the bug ;) – pepr Jun 22 '12 at 11:04
    
+1 I think for very long sentences using two lists might actually be faster than a sort, but I haven't tried it out. – hochl Jun 22 '12 at 14:28

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