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I have a CMS that takes url arguments to return a list of results with this structure:

website.com/argument_1/argument_2.

In order for the site to return the results the args have to have underscores.

However, the code that is generated for the url structure is

website.com/argument-1/argument-2. I need to keep this url structure, but, when someone clicks the link, I need it passed to PHP via apache with the underscores.

I hope that makes sense. Is this done with .htaccess and rewrite rules? I have never written any thing like that before, so any help is appreciated. Thanks

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This is much easier done inside PHP... pass everything in, and replace before parsing the arguments –  poncha Jun 22 '12 at 8:17
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should definitely do this in PHP. Here is a solution that will work, but requires one pass through RewriteRule for each dash in the URL, so I don't recommend it. But regardless:

RewriteEngine On
RewriteRule ^(.*)-(.*)$ $1_$2 [QSA]

To clarify what will happen here, if the request is for http://www.example.com/argument-1/argument-2/argument-3, the RewriteRule will be run multiple times because it can only replace a single dash per pass. So the URL will be transformed something like this:

Pass 1: http://www.example.com/argument-1/argument-2/argument_3 
Pass 2: http://www.example.com/argument-1/argument_2/argument_3 
Pass 3: http://www.example.com/argument_1/argument_2/argument_3 

As for the $1 and $2, these refer back to the parenthesized components from the regular expression. The regular expression, ^(.*)-(.*)$, breaks down like this:

  • ^ - Match the beginning of the URI
  • (.*) - Match (and capture) any number of characters, this will be $1 in the replacement
  • - - Match a dash
  • (.*) - Match (and capture) any number of characters, this will be $2 in the replacement
  • $ - Match the end of the URI

So the first pass through, $1 will be /argument-1/argument-2/argument and $2 will be 3. The replacement then puts an underscore between the 2 of them and creates a new URI:

/argument-1/argument-2/argument_3

Then it runs again because the regular expression still matches the new URI (because it has a - in it) and $1 is /argument-1/argument and $2 is 2/argument_3. The replacement then puts an underscore between the 2 of them and creates a new URI:

/argument-1/argument_2/argument_3

Then it runs again because the regular expression still matches the new URI (because it has a - in it) and $1 is /argument and $2 is 1/argument_2/argument_3. The replacement then puts an underscore between the 2 of them and creates a new URI:

/argument_1/argument_2/argument_3

Then Apache continues with this URI since the regular expression no longer matches (because there are no more dashes).

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Hi Sean, thanks for a great answer. Are you saying that this is going to provide a lot of overhead? What are the downsides of doing this in the .htaccess file? Looks like a lot of support for a PHP solution. I don't have access to the code that controls this functionality, but, I can write a quick script that is called before the rest of the code and upload it. Should I just change the $_SERVER query string variable and replace it there? Also, in your answer, $1_$2.. is that for each of the arguments? Can I remove the _$2 for just the first argument or add $2_$3 for a third option? –  user658182 Jun 23 '12 at 9:12
    
I've updated my answer to explain in more detail. –  Sean Bright Jun 25 '12 at 13:27
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