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I would like to create a method in additional to the default 'foo'.titlecase that will correctly add "possessiveness" to it.

The string is a user's name (<- just did one right there! )

For example: "sam" is the user <%= user.titlecase.possessive + ' Profile' %> => #Sam's Profile

It just needs to handle edge cases like:

Steelers's Profile ( should be Steelers' Profile) Ross's Profile ( should be Ross' Profile )

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Where is the user's name stored? Do you mean it is the class name? –  txwikinger Jul 12 '09 at 4:54
    
Looks like a minimalist solution here: gist.github.com/474384 –  Benson Jul 13 '10 at 19:49
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5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

I needed this too and so I made the implementation available on github and as a gem on rubygems so you can include it in your project pretty easy.

In rails 3 all you do is

gem "possessive" 

and you will have it.

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Thank you, this is perfect. –  Tobias Cohen May 10 '11 at 4:30
5  
It looks like this gem (and all the other comments on here) are doing it wrong. You can't just add an apostrophe to any noun that ends in 's', it needs to be singular. "Mr. Adams' violin is a Guarneri." is incorrect. "Mr. Adams's violin is a Guarneri." is correct. –  bratsche Dec 26 '11 at 3:34
9  
@bratsche I disagree. "Carlos' opinion is correct" –  Carlos Rendon May 28 '12 at 21:39
6  
Technically, @bratsche is correct. The inclusion of the 's' is only dependent upon whether the word is singular or plural, not whether it ends in 's' or not. See here: grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/possessives.htm Carlos's opinion doesn't reflect proper English. –  KurtPreston Jun 14 '13 at 21:54
3  
Citing grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/possessives.htm: "Consistency is the key here: if you choose not to add the -s after a noun that already ends in s, do so consistently throughout your text." Nowhere it is said that omitting the -s from a singular possessive ending in an S is a breaking of a rule--only a recommendation. The key, as is stated, is consistency. So, you're both correct, and if you follow the rule of the gem (which omits the S), it works fine. –  Jason T Featheringham Dec 18 '13 at 22:28
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A minor rewrite of BaroqueBobcat's code, for Shoulda lovers (and lovers of the ternary operator):

Initializer:

module StringExtensions
  def possessive
    self + ('s' == self[-1,1] ? "'" : "'s")
  end
end

class String
  include StringExtensions
end

Shoulda spec:

require File.expand_path(File.dirname(__FILE__) + "/../test_helper")

class StringExtensionsTest < ActiveSupport::TestCase
  context 'String' do
    context '#possessive' do
      should "turn sam into sam's" do
        assert_equal "sam's", "sam".possessive
      end
      should "turn Steelers into Steelers'" do
        assert_equal "Steelers'", "Steelers".possessive
      end
    end
  end
end
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What you want is pretty trivial to do, given ruby's open classes.

class String
  def possessive
    self + case self[-1,1]#1.8.7 style
    when 's' then "'"
    else "'s"
    end
  end
end


#rspec examples
describe "String#possessive" do
  it "should turn Steelers into Steelers'" do
    "Steelers".possessive.should == "Steelers'"
  end
  it "should turn sam into sam's" do
    "sam".possessive.should == "sam's"
  end
end

You would probably want to put this in a plugin, to keep it separate from your business logic code.

$ script/generate plugin Possessiveate

Then just drop the code to the generated init.rb in the plugin's directory. Pretty much all the other generated files aren't needed, but you might be interested in looking at the default file structure.

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I didn't really want to use a Gem so implemented a combination of some answers already here. But then I was woken in the middle of the night by the realisation that these examples are incorrect. What about "who" and "it"? (English is hard!)

module Possessive
  def possessive
    suffix = if self.downcase == 'it'
      "s"
    elsif self.downcase == 'who'
      'se'
    elsif self.end_with?('s')
      "'"
    else
      "'s"
    end
    self + suffix
  end
end

class String
  include Possessive
end

And the specs:

describe Possessive do
  it "has possessive names not ending in s" do
    "james".possessive.should == "james'"
  end

  it "has possessive names not ending in s" do
    "James".possessive.should == "James'"
  end

  it "has possessive names ending in s" do
    "sally".possessive.should == "sally"
  end

  it "has possessive names ending in s" do
    "Sally".possessive.should == "Sally's"
  end

  it "has possessive its" do
    "it".possessive.should == "its"
  end

  it "has possessive Its" do
    "It".possessive.should == "Its"
  end

  it "has possessive who" do
    "who".possessive.should == "whose"
  end

  it "has possessive Who" do
    "Who".possessive.should == "Whose"
  end
end

Note: It's not the most elegant solution. But as Albert Einstein said, elegance is for tailors.

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This is excellent, but where do you best add the code in an Rails 3.2 app? –  Fellow Stranger Oct 1 '13 at 11:22
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If you think that the condition used in all these answers thus far is incorrect, you can instead check if the word is already pluralized.

So using Jamie Flournoy's solution as an example, you can use self == self.pluralize instead of 's' == self[-1, 1], and get these results:

"Steelers".possessive # Steelers'
"Ross".possessive # Ross's
"Chris".possessive # Chris' before inflections.rb change, Chris's after

"Ross".pluralize is already "Rosses", as it might be expected. But "Chris".pluralize isn't, so you would have to add inflection.irregular "Chris", "Chrises" to inflections.rb in order for the possessive form to show up properly. And I suppose you may have to continually add irregularities for other uncommon words/names to end up having the right possessive forms.

Again this is if you're under the other belief that it's insufficient to check whether the last letter of a string is s.

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